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Best Answer araver, 27 July 2013 - 10:03 PM

Questions:

5. Do you define blood relatives as having one common ancestor (male or female)?

 

Spoiler for Setup

 

6. When you say that all creatures will choose a mating situation, if one exists, where everyone mates, does this only apply to choosing a global optimal solution? Or do they need to "choose" a situation where as many as possible mate? (Forced / Greedy approach).

Spoiler for

 

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7 replies to this topic

#1 BMAD

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 07:12 AM

Six unrelated beings randomly selects their mates (three female and three male). Where 1 female mates with 1 male. The result of such mating produces two offspring, one male and one female from each mating. Once the new generation comes of age, the random mating event happens again except blood relatives cannot mate. the process repeats. The beings die upon surving through the production of the second group of offspring.

How many generations until the creatures can no longer mate? If they can always choose a partner, why?

Assume that all creatures will choose a mating situation, if one exists, where everyone mates.

Edited by BMAD, 27 July 2013 - 07:18 AM.

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#2 bonanova

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 07:41 AM

  1. Shall we assume that mates are always of the same generation?
    That is, would a man be prohibited from mating with his mother-in-law?
    :wacko:
     
  2. Does the OP mean to say that once a person becomes a grandparent, then s/he dies? Wondering why this is necessary, unless cross-generational marriages could happen.
     
  3. When children come of age, may their parents mate (again), with a different opposite-sex person from their own generation, and bear more children? Or does each person parent two and only two offspring?
     
  4. Shall we assume that the blood relationship prohibition for marriage is absolute?
    Often, by civil law, second cousins, but not first cousins, may marry.

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#3 gavinksong

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 10:13 AM

Spoiler for my guess


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#4 BMAD

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 02:54 PM

  • Shall we assume that mates are always of the same generation?

    Any generation can mate with any other generation as long as they aren't related.


    That is, would a man be prohibited from mating with his mother-in-law?
    :wacko:
     
  • Does the OP mean to say that once a person becomes a grandparent, then s/he dies? Wondering why this is necessary, unless cross-generational marriages could happen.

    Once grand kids are born or ones second child is born you die (helps with keeping the numbers manageable)
     
  • When children come of age, may their parents mate (again), with a different opposite-sex person from their own generation, and bear more children? Or does each person parent two and only two offspring?

    There is no assumption of monogamy as long as they aren't related they can mate. Remember mating is random.
     
  • Shall we assume that the blood relationship prohibition for marriage is absolute?
    Yes. One drop of common blood prevents mating.


    Often, by civil law, second cousins, but not first cousins, may marry.

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#5 araver

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 10:03 PM   Best Answer

Questions:

5. Do you define blood relatives as having one common ancestor (male or female)?

 

Spoiler for Setup

 

6. When you say that all creatures will choose a mating situation, if one exists, where everyone mates, does this only apply to choosing a global optimal solution? Or do they need to "choose" a situation where as many as possible mate? (Forced / Greedy approach).

Spoiler for

 


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#6 BMAD

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 10:28 PM

Greedy (as many mate in a single instance as possible). Blood relatives means that they have a genetic relation.
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#7 gavinksong

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 08:33 AM

I assumed the greedy approach and got a similar result (but not quite the same) as araver after running one simulation.

I used different matings however. Perhaps the result is different depending on how you pair up the individuals?

 

Spoiler for My simulation


Edited by gavinksong, 28 July 2013 - 08:37 AM.

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#8 gavinksong

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 08:47 AM

I realized that I made a mistake. There is one more mating that is possible since the old generation is still alive.

 

Which means I got the same result as araver even though I paired the individuals up differently. So this must be the solution?

 

Spoiler for Corrected


Edited by gavinksong, 28 July 2013 - 08:51 AM.

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