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Three-letter Tic Tac Toe - Straight version


Best Answer jddouglas, 22 January 2013 - 04:23 PM

My first random effort netted ten.

 

Spoiler for 10

 

After some work I came up with 15. I couldn't use some of these in a sentence, but they sure work with Words With Friends. Only one that isn't good is LIO.

 

Spoiler for 15
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9 replies to this topic

#1 bonanova

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 03:29 AM

OK so I feel obligated to make a puzzle that is not a duplicate of a previous one.
We can "straighten" the situation out by requiring that the words made from a 3x3 array of letters not have bends or kinks.

This reduces the maximum number to sixteen words.

Thus,

W D O
A I D
S Q N


permits AID WIN WAS and SAW, but not DID DIN SIN WAD or ODD.

Sixteen is perfect, and minimum for an entry is ten.

You make the grid. Duplicate letters are permitted.

 

Enjoy. ;)


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The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
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#2 BobbyGo

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 03:41 PM

Spoiler for 11

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#3 jddouglas

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:23 PM   Best Answer

My first random effort netted ten.

 

Spoiler for 10

 

After some work I came up with 15. I couldn't use some of these in a sentence, but they sure work with Words With Friends. Only one that isn't good is LIO.

 

Spoiler for 15

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#4 Prime

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:13 AM

I assume, duplicate occurences of the sme word don't count.

This would be a good programming exercise.

I got 12 different words.

Spoiler for


Edited by Prime, 23 January 2013 - 07:15 AM.

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Past prime, actually.


#5 bonanova

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 08:41 AM

I assume, duplicate occurences of the sme word don't count.

This would be a good programming exercise.

I got 12 different words.

Spoiler for

Someone claimed to get all sixteen. With only one odd one.

I will look for the list.


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#6 Prime

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:00 AM

Meanwhile, here are 13 different words

Spoiler for 13

 


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Past prime, actually.


#7 ThunderCloud

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 11:48 PM

Two questions:

 

(1) Do any of the following count as "words": non-English words, acronyms, proper nouns?

 

(2) If a word is a palindrome (such as "eye"), does it count once or twice?


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#8 bonanova

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 05:44 AM

Two questions:

 

(1) Do any of the following count as "words": non-English words, acronyms, proper nouns?

 

(2) If a word is a palindrome (such as "eye"), does it count once or twice?

  1. English, not proper, not acronyms
  2. It would count twice.
    We are looking for how many of the sixteen possible three-letter strings are words.

There are solutions greater than 13.


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#9 Prime

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 06:37 AM

Two questions:

 

(1) Do any of the following count as "words": non-English words, acronyms, proper nouns?

 

(2) If a word is a palindrome (such as "eye"), does it count once or twice?

  1. English, not proper, not acronyms
  2. It would count twice.
    We are looking for how many of the sixteen possible three-letter strings are words.

There are solutions greater than 13.

If the same word may occur more than once, it's a different matter. Then 16 may be possible. Jddouglas already posted 15 (post #3.)


Edited by Prime, 15 February 2013 - 06:40 AM.

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Past prime, actually.


#10 bonanova

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:05 AM

Thanks Prime, I overlooked that post somehow.


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- Bertrand Russell




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