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Pole in lake


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115 replies to this topic

#81 amanda

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 06:47 PM

I too came up with 12 feet.
1/3 is in the water and 8 feet is out of the water.
8 feet = 2/3
1/2 of that is 4 feet
So each 1/3 is 4 feet
4x3=12 feet
It doesn't matter how much is in the ground as long as you know how much is in and out of the water.



I see in your calculations where you've accounted for the 1/3 of the length that is in the water and the remaining 2/3 that are not in the ground. Where is the portion that is in the ground?

In US english, when you say something is "out of the water," it means that it is completely out of the lake or whatever body of water it is, and the space below it is not considered to be "out of the water." Also, when stated as: "One half of the pole is in the ground," it is understood to mean: "One half of the total length of the pole is in the ground." The second part of the statement, directly following the first part says, "another one third is covered by water " which is understood to mean "another one third of the total length of the pole is covered by water," however, the "of the total length of the pole" is not repeated because it is simply understood. Unless the OP specifies or clarifies, I think the answer should be 48.

What is not clear is if the pole is straight or if it changes shape like lost in space mentioned, a pole that bends

One half of the pole, (3/6ths) is in the ground.
Another one third of the pole, (2/6ths) is in the water, leaving only 1/6th remaining.
8 feet, our remaining 1/6th of the total length of the pole, is out of the water.

So if 8 feet is 1/6th of the pole, the total length of the pole is 8*6=48 feet.
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#82 plortylox

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 07:26 PM

Surely it's 48 feet


his name isnt Surely, and got 48 feet myself
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#83 Abby Normal

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 07:45 PM

I see in your calculations where you've accounted for the 1/3 of the length that is in the water and the remaining 2/3 that are not in the ground. Where is the portion that is in the ground?

In US english, when you say something is "out of the water," it means that it is completely out of the lake or whatever body of water it is, and the space below it is not considered to be "out of the water." Also, when stated as: "One half of the pole is in the ground," it is understood to mean: "One half of the total length of the pole is in the ground." The second part of the statement, directly following the first part says, "another one third is covered by water " which is understood to mean "another one third of the total length of the pole is covered by water," however, the "of the total length of the pole" is not repeated because it is simply understood. Unless the OP specifies or clarifies, I think the answer should be 48.

What is not clear is if the pole is straight or if it changes shape like lost in space mentioned, a pole that bends

One half of the pole, (3/6ths) is in the ground.
Another one third of the pole, (2/6ths) is in the water, leaving only 1/6th remaining.
8 feet, our remaining 1/6th of the total length of the pole, is out of the water.

So if 8 feet is 1/6th of the pole, the total length of the pole is 8*6=48 feet.



It stated that half was in the ground. If something is in the ground then it is NOT in water. And we know that 8 feet is not in the water.
I say the the pole is sticking in the lake vertically and 6 feet is in the ground (half) and 4 feet is in the water (1/3) and 2 feet sticking out of the water. Which would be 8 feet out of water.
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#84 Gambit

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 07:09 AM

i got 24... :) i'm pretty sure this is right...

Edited by Gambit, 10 June 2008 - 07:11 AM.

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#85 MAD

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 02:08 PM

There is a pole in a lake. One half of the pole is in the ground, another one third is covered by water and eight feet is out of the water. What is the total length of the pole in feet?

Has anyone thought that maybe the pole is not vertical? It could be along a steep shore of the lake at a diagonal.

I apologize for the crude drawing (I'm not very good with laptop touchpads), but this would be a way it could be 12'.
4' in W, 2' in A, 6' in G.

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Edited by MAD, 10 June 2008 - 02:09 PM.

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#86 rl_socal

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 03:58 PM

Spoiler for my answer

Edited by rl_socal, 10 June 2008 - 04:06 PM.

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#87 rl_socal

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 04:12 PM

Spoiler for my answer



Spoiler for amendment

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#88 MAD

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 11:28 PM

I thought of another possible answer: 8'

The pole could be horizontal with 1/2 of its cross-sectional area in the ground and another 1/3 of its cross-sectional area in water, but the remaining portion of the cross-section would still be 8' long.

It is obvious that there are multiple answers to this question and it sure would be nice if the question-poser would clarify and/or explain what his thought process was.
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#89 Gambit

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 08:18 AM

yeah although there are two possible answers to this question, i think the q-poser was going for the straight forward ans of 48ft.
Tex i think its about time you give an ans...
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#90 dnae

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 10:56 PM

There is a pole in a lake. One half of the pole is in the ground, another one third is covered by water and eight feet is out of the water. What is the total length of the pole in feet?


48ft
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