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Can you name three words in the English language which have at least five letters but do not contain a, e, i, o, or u?

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lymph - nymph

dryly - shyly - slyly - spryly - wryly

lynch - synch [look like they should rhyme anyway ...] ;)

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Posted · Report post

Can you think of three more? None of those are the ones I was considering. Very nice, though.

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tryst

pygmy

flyby

crypt

glyph

myrrh

hymns*

myths*

*tried not to go to plurals ... kind of cheating, but myth is such a neat word.

and, ok, rhythm

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Posted · Report post

And gypsy

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I am glad that you said "Can you name three words in the English language which have at least five letters but do not contain a, e, i, o, or u?" instead of just asking for words which do not contain vowels because...

Yes, the letter Y is a vowel or a consonant! In terms of sound, a vowel is 'a speech sound which is produced by comparatively open configuration of the vocal tract, with vibration of the vocal cords but without audible friction...', while a consonant is 'a basic speech sound in which the breath is at least partly obstructed' (definitions from the New Oxford Dictionary of English, 1998). The letter Y can be used to represent different sounds in different words, and can therefore fit either definition. In myth or hymn it is clearly a vowel, and also in words such as my, where it stands for a diphthong (a combination of two vowel sounds). On the other hand, in a word like beyond there is an obstacle to the breath which can be heard between two vowels, and the same sound begins words like young and yes. (This consonant sound, like that of the letter W, is sometimes called a 'semivowel' because it is made in a similar way to a vowel, but functions in contrast to vowels when used in words.) Whether the letter Y is a vowel or a consonant is therefore rather an arbitrary decision. The letter is probably more often used as a vowel, but in this role is often interchangeable with the letter I. However, the consonant sound is not consistently represented in English spelling by any other letter, and perhaps for this reason Y tends traditionally to be counted among the consonants.

http://www.askoxford.com/asktheexperts/faq...utother/lettery

Edited by bigbear311
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Posted · Report post

Wait, there's more ... Grrrr! and Shhhh! B))

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Wait, there's more ... Grrrr! and Shhhh! B))

You seem to have forgotten brrrr, and pssst. Any others? hmmmm....

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