• 0
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Question

Posted · Report post

OK, here's a bit of fun. Works better in spoken form but we have to make do!

Not my idea either but I'm afraid I don't know where it comes from so apologies if you've all heard it before.

Think of a meaningful sentence which contains the word "and", five times, consecutively (no other words in between), as in "and and and and and" *.

You can add punctuation but no full stops; this is just one sentence.

It can be done!

Here's the answer (have a good go at it before looking, it really can be done). Feel free to come up with a better answer if you can :D

The landlord of "The Pig and Whistle" pub is having a new sign painted. He comes out to see how the sign painter is doing.

"No, no." says the landlord. "That won't do. There's not enough space between 'The' and 'Pig', and too much space between 'Pig' and 'and', and 'and' and 'Whistle'."

Ta-da!

* You might say that the question answers itself. Not a very good answer though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 answers to this question

  • 0

Posted · Report post

I will repeat this word until you tell me to stop: and and and and and ... had enough?

The answers to your three and/or questions are: and, and and, and and.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted · Report post

Looking at a written work as some such....

Me<sp><sp><sp>and<sp><sp><sp><sp>you

"Look at the spacing here, there are too many spaces between "Me" and "and" and "and" and "you."

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted · Report post

Here is one related to this, but instead of coming up with the sentence, the trick is to make the sentence make sense.

"buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo"

No punctuation is needed, though a bit capitalization helps.

"Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo"

  • The city of Buffalo, New York.
  • A type of bison known as a buffalo.
  • To intimidate people is to "buffalo" them.

The sentence can then be interpreted as:

Bison from Buffalo that are intimidated by other bison from Buffalo are, themselves, intimating to other bison from Buffalo.

This might also help:

"[1]Buffalo [2]buffalo [3]Buffalo [4]buffalo [5]buffalo [6]buffalo [7]Buffalo [8]buffalo"

Bison[2] from Buffalo[1] that are intimidated[5] by other bison[4] from Buffalo[3] are, themselves, intimating[6] to other bison[8] from Buffalo[7].

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.