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Pouring water VI.

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Pouring water VI. - Back to the Water and Weighing Puzzles

Given three bowls: bowl A (8 liters capacity) filled with 5 liters of water; bowl B (5 liters capacity) filled with 3 liters of water; and bowl C (3 liters capacity) filled with 2 liters of water.

Can you measure exactly 1 liter, by transferring the water only 2 times?

This old topic is locked since it was answered many times. You can check solution in the Spoiler below.

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Pouring Water VI. - solution

1st Pour 1 litre from bowl A to bowl C. Thus 4 litres are left in the bowl A and bowl C is full (3 litres).

2nd Pour 2 litres from bowl C to bowl B. Doing that you have full bowl B (5 litres) and there is 1 litre left in bowl C.

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this reminded me of the Die Hard With a Vengeance puzzle in the park, so I kept asking myself how can you be so sure that you're only pouring one liter? It made me through a bunch of solutions out the window. Good solution though.

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got it

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1. top off bowl C with water from bowl A

2. top off bowl B with water from now full bowl C. What's left is in bowl C is 1L of water.

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Doesn't this solution go against the principles in all the other water jug problems?

The first step in the solution says to

Pour 1 litre from jug A into jug C.
How do you know how much 1 litre is?? And, if you could pour single litres out of jugs, why not just pour 1 litre out of the 3-litre jug and be finished in 1 step? Am i wrong?
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I just realized I was wrong indeed...

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How do you know how much 1 litre is?? And, if you could pour single litres out of jugs, why not just pour 1 litre out of the 3-litre jug and be finished in 1 step? Am i wrong?

because being as C only has one liter of empty space in it, so long as you fill it up you are taking ONE liter away from what ever pitcher you used to pour into it. Same thing for the second step, pur 2 liters into B. B only has 2 liters of empty space in it so to filll it up you are taking 2 liters aways from C. C had three before this step, 3 - the 2 liters going into B and there you have it. 1 liter left in C

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Alternatively you can use the following solution:

1. Fill C with B leaving 4 litres in B

2. Fill A with B leaving 1 litre in B.

Can't get easier than that

Oh BTW deplacing 1 litre implies that you can only fill the container with a max of 1 litre. There's no measuring involved here.

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Alternatively you can use the following solution:

1. Fill C with B leaving 4 litres in B

B starts with 3 liters.

Filling C [takes 1 liter] leaves 2 [not 4] liters in B.

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You don't need B at all.

Fill C from A leaving 4 liters in A.

Dump out the water in C.

Then fill C from A again, leaving 1 Liter in A

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You don't need B at all.

Fill C from A leaving 4 liters in A.

Dump out the water in C.

Then fill C from A again, leaving 1 Liter in A

Depending on your interpretation, that could be seen as 3 pours: dumping the water from C requires pouring it out.

Wait a minute! Does that mean that if I use a siphon I can claim I did it with 0 pours?!?! I'm a genius!

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I got it!

1. Continue pouring Bowl A into Bowl C until A is empty. C should now have 3 liters.

2. Pour Bowl C into Bowl B until Bowl B is full. Only 1 liter should be remaining in Bowl C after that.

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okay here goes,

start by pouring the eight into the three, preferably overflowing 4 liters onto the floor because it's messy and the 8litre bowl would make a funny hat.

now pour the three into the five WITHOUT overflowing it.

that would leave you one perfectly measured litre in the 3litre bowl.

now parade around the room in your cool 8litre hat and enjoy a one litre drink!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Peace

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This is a stupid puzzle and the posted solution is incorrect.

8 liter bowl is useless

5 liter bowl is useless

To measure EXACTLY 1 LITER:

1st pour: Pour out the 2 liter bowl

2st pour: Pour the 3 liter bowl into the empty two liter bowl, stop when two liter bowl is full, 1 LITER is remaining.

3-2=1 this is true last time i checked

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This is a stupid puzzle and the posted solution is incorrect.

8 liter bowl is useless

5 liter bowl is useless

To measure EXACTLY 1 LITER:

1st pour: Pour out the 2 liter bowl

2st pour: Pour the 3 liter bowl into the empty two liter bowl, stop when two liter bowl is full, 1 LITER is remaining.

3-2=1 this is true last time i checked

that does not work since the bowls are not full ... for instance, there is no two liter bowl (the third bowl has 3 litres capacity and is filled with 2 litres)

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oops misread the puzzle, solution is correct, but solution/ puzzle could be worded better - though subtle i think adds some clarity

Having three bowls each partially filled with water.

Bowl A (8 litres capacity) has 5 litres of water.

Bowl B (5 litres capacity) has 3 litres of water.

Bowl C (3 litres capacity) has 2 litres of water.

Can you measure exactly 1 litre, pouring only 2 times?

1st Pour: Using Bowl A, fill Bowl C (which contains 2L of 3L capacity).

2nd Pour: Using Bowl C (which now contains 3L), fill Bowl B (which contains 3L of 5L capacity)

The two liters from removed from Bowl C to fill Bowl B will leave exactly 1 Liter.

possible other solution though could be difficult: empty Bowl A, place finger along edge of the middle of the edge of bowl C and pour with one stream going into empty bowl and other in to bowl B. Should give 1 liter. also if emptying doesn't count as pour could empty both A and B and get two bowl each with 1 liter. Making to equal size & shape holes at bottom of bowl would also split water well

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LOL, you guys are thinking to much. Just use a measuring cup. pouring half from one bowl, and the other half liter from another bowl. 2 pours. 1 liter.

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Pour 1 liter from A B or C into a measuring cup. :lol:

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You can't be sure how much 1 litre is. If you knew how much a litre couldn't you just empty one bowl and pour one litre out? Anyway, the solution i got is you pour 1 litre from A to C. Then, you pour 2 litres from C to B.

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The question says "measure" 1 liter.

Although I believe the following to be correct:

A - B - C

is

5 - 3 - 2

Pour A(-1) in to C(+1)

4 - 3 - 3

Pour C(-2) in to B(+2)

4 - 5 - 1

Altenatively to "measure" 1 liter:

5 - 3 - 2

Pour B(-1) in to C(+1)

5 - 2 - 3

Pour B(-2) in to A(+2)

7 - 0 - 3

Since A is 8 liter, the remaining space should "measure" 1 liter.

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Fill up bowl C with bowl A. That makes 3 liters for bowl C. Fill up bowl B with C. bowl B has 2 liters capacity left. Thus C will be left with 1 liter.

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Start with:

5-3-2

Then

4-3-3

Finally

4-5-1

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Took me 5 mins or so but I got it!!

A ---> C

A=4/8 B=3/5 C=3/3

C ---> B

A=4/8 B=5/5

C=1/3 so one litre

(You guys should buy and/or play Professor Layton and the Curious Village on the DS and it is a fantastic puzzle game and has some puzzles like these!!!)

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Here's how you do it with ZERO pours.

Put bowl B (3 litres of water remaining) and C (2 litres of water remaining) on the same temperature heat source and boil.

Wait until bowl C is empty, bowl B now has 1 litre.

Tada...

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pour bowl a into bowl c until bowl c is full. then pour bowl c into bowl b until bowl b is full. What is left in c is one liter

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