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Alone, wandering,

But not without aim.

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

Riding the beast,

Through the heat and the hate.

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate.

Truth and revelation,

In the end of the Dream.

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

Enjoy. :P

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Either Simon or Garfunkel... "He Was My Brother," A song about freedom riders?

I am starting to feel (over)confident that freedom riders have to do with the answer.

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Stokely Carmichael

Ruby Doris Smith Robinson

James Peck

James Farmer

And did I already guess John Lewis?

How about David Fankhauser?

Edited by Mickey

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An updated version. Nothing has changed except the addition of a few lines.(which I may or may not be happy with and which may or may not be helpful) :P

Alone, wandering,

But not without aim.

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

Nary a soul,

To see through my guise,

Save the low shoeshine,

My soul recognized.

Riding the beast,

Through the heat and the hate.

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate.

A martyr to many.

At home? Pariah

Merely a messenger,

Never messiah.

Truth and revelation,

In the end of the Dream.

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

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Either Simon or Garfunkel... "He Was My Brother," A song about freedom riders?

I am starting to feel (over)confident that freedom riders have to do with the answer.

Not at all, I'm afraid

Stokely Carmichael

Ruby Doris Smith Robinson

James Peck

James Farmer

And did I already guess John Lewis?

How about David Fankhauser?

That many more names off the list. Is anyone keeping track??

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OK. One last guess, and then I give up.

...or should I say second base?

Giving up? So soon?? :lol: Yeah, this one has about had it. If someone hasn't solved her by tomorrow morning(my time) then I'll resort to some drastic measures.

Oh, and I have NO idea what your spoiler is alluding to.

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Race/civil rights related

takes place in the "Deep South"(the segregated states)

There is a bus involved, somehow. (It's not municipal transportation.)

A writer who isn't a traditional author(of books, at least)

The work is named from a Langston Hughes poem.

I'll add that the "work" is a book, but didn't start out that way.

We know it's NOT Simon and/or Garfunkle. (And a whole lot of other people.)

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Harry T. Moore? I know Hughes wrote a poem about him... The work could be the NAACP? I doubt it, but worth eliminating, and it's an interesting find.

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Civil rights is a pretty fascinating subject isn't it?

You still haven't hit the mark Mickey.

The dart board is wasted though. I admire and appreciate your tenacity.

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Race/civil rights related

takes place in the "Deep South"(the segregated states)

There is a bus involved, somehow. (It's not municipal transportation.)

A writer who isn't a traditional author(of books, at least)

The work is named from a Langston Hughes poem.

I'll add that the "work" is a book, but didn't start out that way.

We know it's NOT Simon and/or Garfunkle. (And a whole lot of other people.)

Not an answer, necessarily, but

The Freedom Riders organization of the Civil Rights era?

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Ah, bugger! I am starting to think this may be entirely outside my sphere of knowing. I've been trying to find what has been written that was not intended as a book, but it's not an autobiography. You put quotes around 'work,' so I'm not even sure writing in the right direction, which got me onto photography! So, I'm stuck for now. I would like to ask a question, though: How influential was this "work" on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being "I have a dream" and 1 being complete obscurity?

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Black Like Me

John Howard Griffin (had to look up the author)

Oh my, well done. I'd read excerpts from that book from my Oppression class that I took in high school.

Great riddle Grayven, the answer fit so well. The shoeshine part was a great addition.

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Everything fits perfectly with lupetu's answer, the title's from a Hughes poem, it was originally a journal before becoming a book... But Grayven didn't say it was solved...

I can't think of anything else it could be, though, it just seems to fit perfectly. There's a pretty good wikipedia article on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Like_Me. And after all my efforts, I was really hoping to get this one. Alas, I will take some comfort in knowing that I at lease paved a path....

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Black Like Me

John Howard Griffin (had to look up the author)

Winnah winnah chicken dinnah!

Courtesy of Wikipedia:

In the autumn of 1959, John Howard Griffin checked into the Monteleone Hotel, located at 214 Royal Street in New Orleans, Louisiana. Once there, under the care of a dermatologist, Griffin underwent a regimen of large oral doses of the anti-vitiligo drug Oxsoralen and spending up to fifteen hours daily under an ultraviolet lamp.[2] (Vitiligo is a disease that causes lightening of the skin and is most noticeable among people of African ancestry.)

To complete the illusion, Griffin used dyes to cover uneven areas and closely cropped his hair.

During his trip Griffin made it a rule that he would not change his name or alter his identity; if asked who he was or what he was doing, he would tell the truth [3]. In the beginning, he decided to talk as little as possible[4] to ease his transition into the "black world", i.e., the social milieu of southern U.S. blacks. He became accustomed everywhere to the "hate stare" received from whites.

After he disguised himself, many people who knew John Howard Griffin as a white man did not recognize him. A shoeshine man named Sterling Williams in the French Quarter, a man whom Griffin regarded as a friend, made no connection with his looks now that he was black. The only way Sterling realized it was Griffin was because he recognized his shoes, and Griffin opened up to him, explaining his research.

Theres quite a bit more and it's not all that bad for Wikipedia. I've added notes to my completed poem.

Alone, wandering,

But not without aim.

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

That is covered above.

Nary a person,

To see through my guise,

Save the low shoeshine,

My soul recognized. A play on words: soul/sole.

Riding the beast, A greyhound bus

Through the heat and the hate. The segregated deep South.

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate. To illustrate the plight of a different race

A martyr to many. He was largely applauded for his sacrifice and courageousness.

At home? Pariah. Among a few other places, Griffin's home town burned him in effigy.

Merely a messenger, He was a journalist, and never intended his work to be as powerful as it was.

Never messiah.

Truth and revelation, The book opened the eyes of a nation.

In the end of the Dream. "Black like me" is the last line in Langston Hughes' "Dream Variations"

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

B))

Great job lupetu! And thank you all for participating. I HIGHLY recommend the book, and I apologize for the obscurity. I thought it would be better known.

edit: what is up with those wonky fonts? I guess copy/paste isn't always my friend.

Edited by Grayven

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Ah, bugger! I am starting to think this may be entirely outside my sphere of knowing. I've been trying to find what has been written that was not intended as a book, but it's not an autobiography. You put quotes around 'work,' so I'm not even sure writing in the right direction, which got me onto photography! So, I'm stuck for now. I would like to ask a question, though: How influential was this "work" on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being "I have a dream" and 1 being complete obscurity?

At least a 9 in my book ;) Perhaps the relevance is waning. That would not be a bad thing, I think.

Edited by Grayven

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