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Alone, wandering,

But not without aim.

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

Riding the beast,

Through the heat and the hate.

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate.

Truth and revelation,

In the end of the Dream.

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

Enjoy. :P

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I am kind of getting a religiousy feel, here. I wonder if the answer is doG. Or buddha... wait, Siddhartha would be a good answer, as that's his real name!

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for eliminating more options. Religion has little, if anything, to do with it.

I am kind of getting a religiousy feel, here. I wonder if the answer is doG. Or buddha... wait, Siddhartha would be a good answer, as that's his real name!

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Stephen King, The Gunslinger or the Dark Tower Series.

and the name of the Gunslinger is Roland.

It may be an out of the blue guess but the reflection of the "real world" and the world that Roland operates in would fit along with riding the beast (Blaine the Train) and certainly the alone and wandering but not without aim, however I'm not sure how he is linked to another person (unless it's the reader) as these books arent a recent read for me.

Edited by Alethea

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Lol, after reading through the hints all I can think of is Ender Wiggin who wrote The Hive Queen as the Speaker for the Dead in the Ender's Series by Orson Scott Card....

Alone

(exiled as Ender the Xenocide)

wandering, But not without aim.

(looking for a place to hatch the Formic Queen)

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

(Andrew "Ender" Wiggins, barely ages in 3000 years

because of interstellar travel, and keeps his same name,

Well known as the anonymous Speaker for the Dead)

Riding the beast,

Through the heat and the hate.

(Constantly beats himself up over the Xenocide of the Formics, Wrote the book

"The Hive Queen" with the pen name the Speaker for the Dead, to show others

the goodness of the Formics and the horror of what he, Ender, had done.

Humanity Hates Ender the Genocide)

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate.

(Gave a glimpse of the Fate of the Formics)

Truth and revelation,

In the end of the Dream.

(The Formic Queen revealed herself to Ender in Ender's Dreams)

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

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Stephen King, The Gunslinger or the Dark Tower Series.

and the name of the Gunslinger is Roland.

It may be an out of the blue guess but the reflection of the "real world" and the world that Roland operates in would fit along with riding the beast (Blaine the Train) and certainly the alone and wandering but not without aim, however I'm not sure how he is linked to another person (unless it's the reader) as these books arent a recent read for me.

that I will ever reference anything by Stephen King.

:P I'm not what you would consider a fan.

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Lol, after reading through the hints all I can think of is Ender Wiggin who wrote The Hive Queen as the Speaker for the Dead in the Ender's Series by Orson Scott Card....

Alone

(exiled as Ender the Xenocide)

wandering, But not without aim.

(looking for a place to hatch the Formic Queen)

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

(Andrew "Ender" Wiggins, barely ages in 3000 years

because of interstellar travel, and keeps his same name,

Well known as the anonymous Speaker for the Dead)

Riding the beast,

Through the heat and the hate.

(Constantly beats himself up over the Xenocide of the Formics, Wrote the book

"The Hive Queen" with the pen name the Speaker for the Dead, to show others

the goodness of the Formics and the horror of what he, Ender, had done.

Humanity Hates Ender the Genocide)

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate.

(Gave a glimpse of the Fate of the Formics)

Truth and revelation,

In the end of the Dream.

(The Formic Queen revealed herself to Ender in Ender's Dreams)

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

Nope... I'm contemplating another hint. Perhaps this evening....

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So... this author, is he writing as a matter of personal experience or is this fiction?

Am I correct in this analysis of this riddle? The man being described, seems like he did something that altered another man's fate (probably for the worse) and he feels regret, thus he's searching for truth in the midst of this "war" going on in his head.

I hope this answer isn't beyond my realm of knowledge...haha

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I think we may need the type of story it is.

Edited by zzembower

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I feel like I'm reaching but,

John Proctor from Miller's The Crucible?

Or maybe,

Sydney Carton?

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So... this author, is he writing as a matter of personal experience or is this fiction?

Am I correct in this analysis of this riddle? The man being described, seems like he did something that altered another man's fate (probably for the worse) and he feels regret, thus he's searching for truth in the midst of this "war" going on in his head.

I hope this answer isn't beyond my realm of knowledge...haha

Answers in order of appearance:

Yes.

Not even close.

Very likely it is, but only because it's almost 2 generations removed from you.

edit: and nope to the rest of you.

Edited by Grayven

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I think we may need the type of story it is.
It is autobiographical. But you won't find it in that section of the library, I don't think.
Edited by Grayven

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is it some autobiography we might know of

Please use spoilers, Shakee doesn't want help ;)

The spoiler buttons can be found directly to the left and above in the "insert special item" areas.

I'll answer this one outside of a spoiler, because I'm quickly realizing this may be much tougher than I first expected. The majority of BrainDenizens will probably be too young to be very familiar with this work.

A martyr to many. At home? Pariah.

Merely a messenger, never messiah.

Fit that in just before the final two lines.

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Martin Luther King jr?

it's a bit of a sketchy fit, but the Dream part made me think of him, and also reminded me of the reflection pool in DC.

I'm putting this up here for a reason. It was a wild guess, but the closest anyone has been thus far.

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but i feel happy my pariah and martyr stuff was close :P

gahndi?

Ghandi has already been guessed. We've been told that the answer is not religious at all, which, unfortunately, led me to dismiss my idea of Kahlil Gibran. I think Ghandi would also be considered religious. We've also been told that this is at least two generations old, which lead me to believe we should be looking at, depending on the length of a generation, anywhere from 50 to 100 years ago as the date of composition.

Rosa Parks?

It seems to fit very well:

Alone, wandering,

But not without aim.

(Riding the bus alone, wanting to sit down.)

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

(Being ignored due to racial discrimination, called the "N" word, black features)

Riding the beast,

Through the heat and the hate.

(A bus in a racist society)

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate.

(Seeing less racial tensions, "Man's" being white man/black man (collective terms))

Truth and revelation,

In the end of the Dream.

(MLK Jr.'s Dream)

A martyr to many. At home? Pariah.

Merely a messenger, never messiah.

(Discriminated against, became a martyr, caused activism, never took leadership role)

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

(She catalyzed the Civil Rights movement)

Edit: Oh, and the name of the poem fits well, too.

I think you may have had us barking up the wrong tree with the "other man's dream.

If this is your intended answer, or even if it is not, I must say this riddle is beautiful. I'm giving it 5 stars.

Edited by Mickey

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MLKjr....Malcom X kinda makes sense but I don't know too much about him. He did write an autobiography with his name in it....

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Malcom X but it doesn't all gel with the riddle (wandering alone?)

I pondered many assasins, including Claudius, Brutus, Oswald, Hinkly, Dewey (as well as thier targets) because of the keywords fate, aim, hate, hidden, etc. Even Trotsky. But none of them seem to match. I'm beginning to suspect it may be obscure.

MLKjr....Malcom X kinda makes sense but I don't know too much about him. He did write an autobiography with his name in it....

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Ghandi has already been guessed. We've been told that the answer is not religious at all, which, unfortunately, led me to dismiss my idea of Kahlil Gibran. I think Ghandi would also be considered religious. We've also been told that this is at least two generations old, which lead me to believe we should be looking at, depending on the length of a generation, anywhere from 50 to 100 years ago as the date of composition.

Rosa Parks?

It seems to fit very well:

Alone, wandering,

But not without aim.

(Riding the bus alone, wanting to sit down.)

Hidden in plain sight,

Same features, same name.

(Being ignored due to racial discrimination, called the "N" word, black features)

Riding the beast,

Through the heat and the hate.

(A bus in a racist society)

Through these eyes, a glimpse,

Of the other man's fate.

(Seeing less racial tensions, "Man's" being white man/black man (collective terms))

Truth and revelation,

In the end of the Dream.

(MLK Jr.'s Dream)

A martyr to many. At home? Pariah.

Merely a messenger, never messiah.

(Discriminated against, became a martyr, caused activism, never took leadership role)

The work I have wrought,

And my name you must glean.

(She catalyzed the Civil Rights movement)

Edit: Oh, and the name of the poem fits well, too.

I think you may have had us barking up the wrong tree with the "other man's dream.

If this is your intended answer, or even if it is not, I must say this riddle is beautiful. I'm giving it 5 stars.

Then again, Mickey's answer sounds promising.

Mickey's answer IS promising. Much closer than MLKjr in many respects.

Right era. Right region. Race is involved, as well as busses. I believe the answer is imminent.

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