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Tragic Riddle!

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A waif plucked from death, by miracle born

Innocent of worldly way,

His cradle so cold and wanting of soul,

Just a prison bereft of stays.

Delivered amid a thundering storm,

Then left! Abandoned! Shunned! Forlorn!

The craven father just wouldn’t be bothered—

And so hurriedly scurried away.

His tutelage brief, surreptitious and free,

A school of one-room for the youth.

Letters he lacked were received through a crack

With love for both teacher and truth.

The servile student by one wasn’t seen,

While others grew cruel and forced him to flee.

When shot from behind for a deed that was kind,

Disdain grew wanton, uncouth.

But look at him now with high, broad brow!

Appraise his wondrous image!

Women who care at this marvel to stare

Would swoon upon glimpsing his visage.

Muscular form and sculpted features,

Such an incredibly stunning creature!

In truth it seems he’s a young woman’s dream,

A lost love in a nightly missive.

He presently broods over far distant sea,

Of his choosing pursued in the game,

Mourning the death of what kin he had left

And his own of the immolate flame.

Now odd to this riddle from ends unto middle

Seeking name seems certainly little,

But nameless the one in this poem now done,

A god’s gift modernity’s stain.

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Posted · Report post

greek mythology. i know hercules/heracles is not right, but thats the only person i can thing of right now.

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Posted · Report post

I have no freaking idea, but that's one of the prettiest riddles i've ever read!

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Posted · Report post

this riddle perfectly describes a character from one of my favorite books i read back in high school

I'm positive it's the wretch from Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein"

Shakee, you are an excellent riddle writer i must say.

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Frankenstein i hope thet is right cuse that is what i got when i finshed reaging id but 4shure at the last line

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harry potter....sounds quite similar

i have not read "Frankenstein", maybe someday now i will

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this riddle perfectly describes a character from one of my favorite books i read back in high school

I'm positive it's the wretch from Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein"

Shakee, you are an excellent riddle writer i must say.

I'll second that. It's a shame that this epic had to fall so quickly. Another fun read, Shakee. :)

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Posted (edited) · Report post

the wretch from Frankenstein i hope thet is right cuse that is what i got when i finshed reaging id but 4shure at the last line

sorry typeo i missed the beging in my spoiler

Edited by Magic_luver101
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ARRRRGGGHHHH!!!!!!! :lol:

Well done Wiz. I suspected it would fall quickly but I couldn't stop myself. I started it and then got so into key aspects of the tale I had to keep going. It took about an hour (though with a few minor edits through the afternoon.) Bravo!

The monster was sculpted (assembled) from dead body parts "plucked" from graveyards and mortuaries. He was animated with lightning during a thunderstorm, but when Victor Frankenstein beheld his horrible creation he abandoned it and fled.

Frankenstein related the story of his schooling to Victor later in the tale. He revealed that he had found shelter in a shack adjoining a hovel housing a poor family and a blind old man, the father of the grown adults. The monster learned to read and write by spying through a crack in the wall. He also felt guilty about scavenging their food so he would do “servile” chores when nobody was home. When the monster finally revealed himself out of his love for these people and need to join humanity, they recoiled in horror and drove him away. Later, the monster rescued a little girl from drowning, but when the girl’s father saw the monster, he shot it. That’s when the monster decided to reap vengeance upon the world and in particular, his creator.

The third stanza is a playful twist on his hideous appearance, and the last line refers to the fact that the nineteen year old Mary Shelly conceived of Frankenstein in a “waking dream” and she believed it was message from a guilt-laden subconscious desire to resurrect her own mother (lost love in a missive) who had died giving her birth.

The novel ends (and begins) in the Arctic Circle with Frankenstein’s ship stranded in the solid ice, the Doctor dying. He had been pursuing his monster out of revenge and guilt, ironically according to the monster’s designs just as the monster had wanted his creator to join with him, yet he had to pursue Frankenstein as he fled from the monster (this was the game). The monster loved, hated, mourned Frankenstein and vowed to cast his own self upon a funeral pyre (immolation).

“A god’s gift modernity’s stain”

The book’s alternate title was The Modern Prometheus. Frankenstein tried to bring the flame of eternal life to the world, as Prometheus had given fire to mortals, but the gift he created was a soulless, vengeful wretch rejected by mankind.

What a brilliant work. Thanks.

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A waif plucked from death, by miracle born

Innocent of worldly way,

His cradle so cold and wanting of soul,

Just a prison bereft of stays.

Delivered amid a thundering storm,

Then left! Abandoned! Shunned! Forlorn!

The craven father just wouldn't be bothered—

And so hurriedly scurried away.

His tutelage brief, surreptitious and free,

A school of one-room for the youth.

Letters he lacked were received through a crack

With love for both teacher and truth.

The servile student by one wasn't seen,

While others grew cruel and forced him to flee.

When shot from behind for a deed that was kind,

Disdain grew wanton, uncouth.

But look at him now with high, broad brow!

Appraise his wondrous image!

Women who care at this marvel to stare

Would swoon upon glimpsing his visage.

Muscular form and sculpted features,

Such an incredibly stunning creature!

In truth it seems he's a young woman's dream,

A lost love in a nightly missive.

He presently broods over far distant sea,

Of his choosing pursued in the game,

Mourning the death of what kin he had left

And his own of the immolate flame.

Now odd to this riddle from ends unto middle

Seeking name seems certainly little,

But nameless the one in this poem now done,

A god's gift modernity's stain.

A very interesting puzzle, Now i will explain why i thought of Harry Potter :)

"plucked from death" -> HP - the one who lived, Lord Vold killed his parents

"cradle so cold",

"prison bereft of stays",

"Delivered amid ..." -> delivered to his aunt

"Then left!...." -> Left ignored for 13yrs

"His tutelage..." -> Had one room under the stairs under guardianship of his aunt

"Letters he lacked..." -> Letters were delivered from the slit in the door

"The servile student.." -> His magic skills were ignored by muggles

"While others grew..." -> The behaviour of his aunt and uncle was simply enexpected and he fled home one night

"But look at him now" -> He has grown and like by women now that he is at Hogwarts

"He presently broods.." -> Onve Lodr Vol is done, he broods of his choice to follow his destiny

"Mourning the death..." -> Mourns over death of sirrius Black and Headmaster

"And his own..." -> the scar that had burnt in the presence of lord Vold

"Seeking name..." -> Although he achieved what no one ever did, he never seeked "fame", althoug the "nameless" or "the one who could not be named" is now done

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Posted · Report post

yeah, i agree with frankenstein's monster

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