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Shakeepuddn

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Shakeepuddn    4

My signature cherished, I’m world renowned,

Ever in flight above the ground.

Teeth of a bull chewing in time,

Gnawing on knots, shunning the find.

Hands at the ready, arms at the stay,

Heart like the sun beating away.

Ears like a rabbit pinned to the side;

Listening close, far, and wide.

Eighteen in all, each heading a state,

Ever awaiting the fall of fate.

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For those of you new to Shakee's riddles: Straight forward google searches are rarely helpful. It usually takes 2-3 degrees of metaphorical changes to be able to get a good google result.

That being said, sometimes the answer right in your face. Good luck. ;)

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for some reason "knawing at knots" reminds me of salt. No idea where that came from.

to a scene from the movie "Warlock" where the hero adds salt to his leather

"Bull-whip" by pouring the salt on then "chewing" on the whip to grind it in. I

have no idea if that applies here, or what actual historic accuracy it might

have from the days of the witch hunts, but there ya go.

Edit: forgot the spoiler!

Edited by Grayven

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Hrmm...

Saturn has 18 or so named "moons" in its orbit. Does each line refer to one of its Moons?

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the constellation Taurus?

The line with the teeth of the bull gave me the idea. Then i wiki'd it and found out the sun appears in the constellation at certain times during the year, which would explain the line about the heart like the sun.

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Shakeepuddn    4

Hmm. I see this one's proving to be a stickler.

GOODY!!!! :lol:

No one yet, most in left field. Only one even scratched the surface with a single line of thought.

Keep trying.

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How about a nuclear submarine from the US Navy? I have another guess if that doesn't get things rolling.

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Ohio Class US Nuclear Submarines

I'll take your word for it. ;) I've been doing taxes for far too long to have the ambition for a research project. If you're correct, I should get partial credit for a "correct-ish" guess. -_-

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I'll take your word for it. ;) I've been doing taxes for far too long to have the ambition for a research project. If you're correct, I should get partial credit for a "correct-ish" guess. -_-

I had the same thought a while ago - well, the Iowa class battleship to be precise - but "ever in flight above the ground" ?!?!? O.o ??!?!?!

I'm more inclined to go with the satellite theme somebody mentioned earlier. Voyager might make sense, except for "eighteen in all, each heading a state", which sounds more like the ISS, but there are only fourteen states involved in that, so basically I have no clue...

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Shakeepuddn    4
How about a nuclear submarine from the US Navy? I have another guess if that doesn't get things rolling.

KA-BOOM!! :D

There are currently eighteen Ohio Class SSBNs (Ballistic Missile Subs) in the U.S. fleet, each named after a state. Submarines transit through the ocean in the same way a plane maneuvers in the sky and there are ALWAYS a standard number of SSBNs prowling the oceans at any one time, one of their primary missions being to avoid detection. A sub "signature" is the noise it emits in transit due to pumps, motors, turbines, cavitation, etc. They are specific to each sub and VERY secret (sorry, that's all I'll say on that matter except that any foreign power would LOVE to have such info). Boomers have passive sonar hydrophone arrays alongside the hull for listening. Each sub utilizes a nuclear reactor ("like" the sun) and a propulsion system that incorporates a bull gear with a standard number of teeth, with the mesh rate (chewing in time) dependent upon speed (knots). Hands at the ready are the crew members and arms at the stay are the nukes, only to be used in the case of a nuclear war (fall of fate).

P.S. Sonar technicians on a U.S. sub are highly skilled analysts called "bubble heads" and are critical to the subsurface mission.

Way to go Grayven, you've reclaimed the throne!

Edited by Shakeepuddn

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KA-BOOM!! :D

There are currently eighteen Ohio Class SSBNs (Ballistic Missile Subs) in the U.S. fleet, each named after a state. Submarines transit through the ocean in the same way a plane maneuvers in the sky and there are ALWAYS a standard number of SSBNs prowling the oceans at any one time, one of their primary missions being to avoid detection. Boomers have passive sonar hydrophone arrays alongside the hull for listening. Each sub utilizes a nuclear reactor ("like" the sun) and a propulsion system that incorporates a bull gear with a standard number of teeth, with the mesh rate (chewing in time) dependent upon speed (knots). Hands at the ready are the crew members and arms at the stay are the nukes, only to be used in the case of a nuclear war (fall of fate).

P.S. Sonar technicians on a U.S. sub are highly skilled analysts called "bubble heads" and are critical to the subsurface mission.

Way to go Grayven, you've reclaimed the throne!

Oh well... so much for that, then :P

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way to go man!!....amazing puzzle...got all of us thinking for quite a while...and kudos to the grayven too for his pointer

and "ever in flight above the ground"...who would have thought :)

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[spoiler=is it opposite day? :wacko: ] whether you were being literal or figurative "ever in flight above the ground" could never translate into 'transit through water' especially the "above the ground" part. i see how everything else fits but man that threw me off. the 'flight' metaphor is fine, but 'above the ground' means 'not below sea level' anyway you look at it. :huh:

sorry for the rant... :blush:

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Shakeepuddn    4
[spoiler=is it opposite day? :wacko: ] whether you were being literal or figurative "ever in flight above the ground" could never translate into 'transit through water' especially the "above the ground" part. i see how everything else fits but man that threw me off. the 'flight' metaphor is fine, but 'above the ground' means 'not below sea level' anyway you look at it. :huh:

sorry for the rant... :blush:

No problem. I was iffy on whether to go so far . . .

ground can refer to both ocean floor and "bottom"

Edited by Shakeepuddn

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Wwwyyzzerdd,

16. Nautical. the bottom of a body of water.

yea i guess i see that now, i gotta expand my mind more when thinking about these!

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yea i guess i see that now, i gotta expand my mind more when thinking about these!

Isn't the phrase for bottoming out "Running aground"? So I quess I can see that.

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...and kudos to the grayven

The Grayven? Well, that goes without saying, really. :P I really like how pretentious it sounds B))

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