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From rocky beginnings and a cumbersome haul

A royal troller sports now a crown and all.

And bereft of good stock, waiting to fall,

Hang ample samples upon fortress walls.

Lo! Hundreds of eyes—rode to the ring;

Blindly his dark course swift following!

Smoking pipes, clashing, they brazenly sing:

“Beware the bitter end never to bring!”

So shackled to colors and with shots all along

Falls the warrior one with arms apart strong.

And a very deep throat so familiar with sound

Knows well the dark hell of that wet, silent ground.

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Here's a re-write to smooth out some rough edges:

******************************************

From rocky beginning and a cumbersome haul

A fisherman sports now crown and all.

And bereft of good stock, waiting to fall

Hang ample samples upon fortress walls.

Lo! Hundreds of eyes—rode to its ring;

Blindly its dark course then following.

Smoking pipes, clashing, they brazenly sing:

“Beware the bitter end ever to bring!”

So shackled for life, with shots all along,

The warrior one falls with arms apart strong.

And a very deep throat so familiar with sound

Knows well the dark hell of the wet, silent ground.

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From rocky beginnings and a cumbersome haul

A royal troller sports now a crown and all.

And bereft of good stock, waiting to fall,

Hang ample samples upon fortress walls.

Lo! Hundreds of eyes—rode to the ring;

Blindly his dark course swift following!

Smoking pipes, clashing, they brazenly sing:

“Beware the bitter end never to bring!”

So shackled to colors and with shots all along

Falls the warrior one with arms apart strong.

And a very deep throat so familiar with sound

Knows well the dark hell of that wet, silent ground.

an anchor? Or is that too literal?

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Well that was fast d3. Was it really so obvious or do you have experience (like me) in that line of work?

The first known anchors where very large, T–shaped rocks with a line attached.

The most common anchor for small vessels is called a “fisherman.”

The bottom of the anchor where the “throat” or curved part of the “arm” meets the shaft is called the “crown.”

Most modern navies use a “stockless” anchor, these hang from (fed through) the “hawespipe” on the sides of combatants (fortress walls).

The chain links are the hundreds of eyes and the chain or rope itself is called the “rode,” which is attached to the “ring” at the top of an anchor. The chain is connected aboard ship in the chain locker and this terminus is called the “bitter end” in navy jargon. Should this much chain be paid out it would likely rip the locker from the ship, or at least cause a certain degree of massive damage. The chain is segmented into “shots” equaling 15 fathoms each. The throat of an anchor dives (sounds) deep to the wet muddy bottom of the sea.

Good job.

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Well that was fast d3. Was it really so obvious or do you have experience (like me) in that line of work?
The first known anchors where very large, T–shaped rocks with a line attached.

The most common anchor for small vessels is called a “fisherman.”

The bottom of the anchor where the “throat” or curved part of the “arm” meets the shaft is called the “crown.”

Most modern navies use a “stockless” anchor, these hang from (fed through) the “hawespipe” on the sides of combatants (fortress walls).

The chain links are the hundreds of eyes and the chain or rope itself is called the “rode,” which is attached to the “ring” at the top of an anchor. The chain is connected aboard ship in the chain locker and this terminus is called the “bitter end” in navy jargon. Should this much chain be paid out it would likely rip the locker from the ship, or at least cause a certain degree of massive damage. The chain is segmented into “shots” equaling 15 fathoms each. The throat of an anchor dives (sounds) deep to the wet muddy bottom of the sea.

Good job.

I may have turned a windlass or two in my day.

Good job yourself. I had the easy part...

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Well that was fast d3. Was it really so obvious or do you have experience (like me) in that line of work?
The first known anchors where very large, T–shaped rocks with a line attached.

The most common anchor for small vessels is called a "fisherman."

The bottom of the anchor where the "throat" or curved part of the "arm" meets the shaft is called the "crown."

Most modern navies use a "stockless" anchor, these hang from (fed through) the "hawespipe" on the sides of combatants (fortress walls).

The chain links are the hundreds of eyes and the chain or rope itself is called the "rode," which is attached to the "ring" at the top of an anchor. The chain is connected aboard ship in the chain locker and this terminus is called the "bitter end" in navy jargon. Should this much chain be paid out it would likely rip the locker from the ship, or at least cause a certain degree of massive damage. The chain is segmented into "shots" equaling 15 fathoms each. The throat of an anchor dives (sounds) deep to the wet muddy bottom of the sea.

Good job.

I assure you, it wasn't that obvious until D3k3 mentioned it. :P

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