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Bob reads on WebMD about a condition known as hypochondria: "a condition," the definition says, "wherein the patient repeatedly believes that he has one or more conditions that he does not have."

Bob begins to believe that, in fact, he has hypochondria. This being a somewhat disturbing psychological condition, Bob goes to his doctor, concerned about his mental health.

"Doctor," Bob says, "I think I have hypochondria!"

The doctor dismisses his concerns, but Bob continues to be worried. He goes back the next month.

"Doctor," Bob says, "I think I have hypochondria!"

Again, the doctor dismisses his concerns. But Bob is still not satisfied. After another month, he goes back, trying one more time.

"Doctor," Bob says, desperate, "I think I have hypochondria!"

"No," his doctor says, frustrated. "You definately don't have hypochondria."

Question: Is Bob's doctor right?

Caveat: we are using the given definition of hypochondria given in the story above, to simplify what is really a rather complex condition.

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Bob reads on WebMD about a condition known as hypochondria: "a condition," the definition says, "wherein the patient repeatedly believes that he has one or more conditions that he does not have."

Bob begins to believe that, in fact, he has hypochondria. This being a somewhat disturbing psychological condition, Bob goes to his doctor, concerned about his mental health.

"Doctor," Bob says, "I think I have hypochondria!"

The doctor dismisses his concerns, but Bob continues to be worried. He goes back the next month.

"Doctor," Bob says, "I think I have hypochondria!"

Again, the doctor dismisses his concerns. But Bob is still not satisfied. After another month, he goes back, trying one more time.

"Doctor," Bob says, desperate, "I think I have hypochondria!"

"No," his doctor says, frustrated. "You definately don't have hypochondria."

Question: Is Bob's doctor right?

Caveat: we are using the given definition of hypochondria given in the story above, to simplify what is really a rather complex condition.

If Bob is having hypochondria, he will complain more and more sickness month after month instead of consistently only 1 sickness which is hypochondria. So the doctor is right, Bob is not having hypochondria.

Maybe wrong, after all it is just a quick thought in a rush situation. :)

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If Bob is having hypochondria, he will complain more and more sickness month after month instead of consistently only 1 sickness which is hypochondria. So the doctor is right, Bob is not having hypochondria.

Maybe wrong, after all it is just a quick thought in a rush situation. :)

That's why I specified the definition of hypochondria given in the story, as I don't want to deal with different interpretations of the disease. Going by that definition alone, is the doctor right in saying that Bob does not have hypochondria?

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He does not have "hypochondria". It says condition not desease. Conditions could have been fever cough pain etc but he can not have hypochondria and say he has hypochondria.

Like a lunatic will never go to the asylum and say he is lunatic!!

:rolleyes: i am not sure if its even making sense now

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new here, but this one seemed simple enough

the definition from web md calls hypochondria a condition and then states that a person who has this will 'repeatedly' complain of 'one' or more conditions. The patient complains of the one condition hypochondria multiple times, so the doctor is wrong.

right?

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Hypocondrium is a region in our body and the term hypocondriac arised from there, so that if somebody has complaints with his body that has no base, he can be called as hypocondriac, unless his complaints are not phsical signs: as head ache, nausea, heart or intestinal complaints. If some body has mental complaints (psichologic) this is not called hypocondria. Because hypocondria is a psichologic condition, as in the definition, if Bob says that he is hypocondriac, then he has some psichologic problems and can't be called as hypocondriac. Thus the doctor is right, he thinks Bob is eather a nerotic or a psichotic.

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Bob reads on WebMD about a condition known as hypochondria: "a condition," the definition says, "wherein the patient repeatedly believes that he has one or more conditions that he does not have."

believes that he has one or more conditions that he does not have.

Given only the information in the question (ie assuming Bob isn't hypocondriac about other diseases) we have two options:

Bob has hypocondria. In which case he is right about him having the condition. Which means he does not have hypocondria.

Bob does not have hypocondria. In which case he's imagining a condition he doesn't have. Which means he has hypocondria.

Either way, we're not consistant. Bob's just wierd.

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Based on the definition,

It's a catch-22. Since he thinks he has hypochondria, he can't have it, because then he would actually HAVE the illness rather than imagining it, which would negate the diagnosis of hypochondria.

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Hypocondrium is a region in our body and the term hypocondriac arised from there, so that if somebody has complaints with his body that has no base, he can be called as hypocondriac, unless his complaints are not phsical signs: as head ache, nausea, heart or intestinal complaints. If some body has mental complaints (psichologic) this is not called hypocondria. Because hypocondria is a psichologic condition, as in the definition, if Bob says that he is hypocondriac, then he has some psichologic problems and can't be called as hypocondriac. Thus the doctor is right, he thinks Bob is eather a nerotic or a psichotic.

So what you're saying is "screw the requirements of the initial puzzle, in which it says to use the provided definition of hypochondria, I'm going to use another definition, and base my answer off of that."

Okay. Well...good work, then. You have succeeded in entirely not answering the puzzle, but rather in making a claim about the world around us...on a logic puzzle website. Huzzah.

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Bob reads on WebMD about a condition known as hypochondria: "a condition," the definition says, "wherein the patient repeatedly believes that he has one or more conditions that he does not have."

Bob begins to believe that, in fact, he has hypochondria. This being a somewhat disturbing psychological condition, Bob goes to his doctor, concerned about his mental health.

"Doctor," Bob says, "I think I have hypochondria!"

The doctor dismisses his concerns, but Bob continues to be worried. He goes back the next month.

"Doctor," Bob says, "I think I have hypochondria!"

Again, the doctor dismisses his concerns. But Bob is still not satisfied. After another month, he goes back, trying one more time.

"Doctor," Bob says, desperate, "I think I have hypochondria!"

"No," his doctor says, frustrated. "You definately don't have hypochondria."

Question: Is Bob's doctor right?

Caveat: we are using the given definition of hypochondria given in the story above, to simplify what is really a rather complex condition.

The doctor is right and wrong. The patient does not have hypochondria because it is a condition in which you believe you have a disease which you don't have, and since he is obsessing about having a disease that he didn't have originally, then he is a hypochondriac, which implies that he is not a hypochondriac because he actually has the disease which he is obsessing about having, thus not fitting the definition for the condition stated above. Circular logic problem.

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What a fun question! This is a perfect example of a Catch-22 (also an excellent book - GO READ IT!!!) He fits all the requirements of having hypochondria. But once we say he has it, the condition becomes real, in which case his fear is justifiable and not just a case of hypochondria. I think a little patient education is in order!

Edited by liontamer
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The docs right, if Bob truly did have hypochondria, I would think that one of those 3 visits, or in between those 3 visits to the good doctor, Bob would have expressed a concern for some type of imaginary ailment already.

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The docs right, if Bob truly did have hypochondria, I would think that one of those 3 visits, or in between those 3 visits to the good doctor, Bob would have expressed a concern for some type of imaginary ailment already.

Bob expressed a concern for an imaginary ailment every time he visited...what ailment? Hypochondria.

:)
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Both Bob and the Doc have hypochondria! :) Bob repeatedly believe he has a problem, while the Doc repeated that Bob doesn't have a problem. lol

But just to talk about Bob: Bob believes that he has hypochondria in which he believes he has one or more conditions that he does not have, and this condition is hypochondria, in which the patient repeatedly believes he has has one or more conditions that he does not have, and that patient is Bob, who believes that he has... (repeat from begining:) lol

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Classic Catch-22

Bob's doctor is correct because...

1) If Bob is a hypochondriac then his concern and repeated trips to the doctor are not for a condition he does not have... therefore he is not exhibiting the required symptom.

2) If he isn't a hypochondriac (as the doctor has surmised) then his concerns and trips to doctor are unfounded and he has nothing to worry about.

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Bob's doctor is correct because...

1) If Bob is a hypochondriac then his concern and repeated trips to the doctor are not for a condition he does not have... therefore he is not exhibiting the required symptom.

2) If he isn't a hypochondriac (as the doctor has surmised) then his concerns and trips to doctor are unfounded and he has nothing to worry about.

But...

As others have pointed out, if the doctor IS correct and Bob isn't a hypochondriac, then he does not have a condition that he repeatedly thinks he has. To not have a condition you repeatedly think you have is, in this puzzle, hypochondria. Thus, Bob has hypochondria. And thus Bob's doctor isn't correct

:)
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Bob's doctor is not correct. He stated that "You definitely don't have hypochondria." However, it is possible that Bob believes he has another condition, say lung cancer, which he does not have. Since the doctor doesn't know for sure that this isn't the case, he's incorrect in his statement.

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Bob can have hypochondria because...though it is said that a hypochondriac imagines a condition which he does not have does not mean that he cannot realize a condition which he actually has.

Here is an example incase it is confusing:

If a hypochondriac actually has cold and cough. Would he not realize that? similarly, if a hypochodriac has hypochodria then (fortunately) he realized it.

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  1. No.
    At least with regard to spelling "definitely".
  2. No.
    He would be right to quit arguing semantics and focus on his patient's health.
    "Bob, although you are presenting symptoms of hypochondria, the only threat to your health that I can discern is your state of anxiety.
    Take these placebos twice a day, and come back in two weeks."
  3. No.
    Bob def-i-nate-lee has hypochondria.
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  1. No.
    At least with regard to spelling "definitely".
  2. No.
    He would be right to quit arguing semantics and focus on his patient's health.
    "Bob, although you are presenting symptoms of hypochondria, the only threat to your health that I can discern is your state of anxiety.
    Take these placebos twice a day, and come back in two weeks."
  3. No.
    Bob def-i-nate-lee has hypochondria.

You're correct, but first:

I think this problem aims to lead us to a paradox just as:

The following centence is true.

The centence above is false.

But life seinces doesn't accomodate paradoxes. Thus I consulted a psychiatrist next door to me, since my profession is irrevelant.

He says that:

If a patients comes and says that he made him a diagnosis of hypocondriasis, and if he really knows what this disorder is, then I'd confirm his diagnosis.

Edited by nobody
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Ironically, this topic makes me naseaus.

should have referred the man to a specialist. And tell him to stay away from WebMD.

On second thought, is the Doctor a General Practitioner, or a Psych-something? This would make a difference as well.

Edited by Grayven
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Bob's doctor is not correct. He stated that "You definitely don't have hypochondria." However, it is possible that Bob believes he has another condition, say lung cancer, which he does not have. Since the doctor doesn't know for sure that this isn't the case, he's incorrect in his statement.

You're adding information to the puzzle. The condition Bob believes he has is hypochondria, not cancer.

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  1. No.
    At least with regard to spelling "definitely".
  2. No.
    He would be right to quit arguing semantics and focus on his patient's health.
    "Bob, although you are presenting symptoms of hypochondria, the only threat to your health that I can discern is your state of anxiety.
    Take these placebos twice a day, and come back in two weeks."
  3. No.
    Bob def-i-nate-lee has hypochondria.

1. Bob's doctor didn't spell definitely, he *said* it. Thus, the doctor is not wrong there.

2. So a doctor, if he is 'right' in focusing on the patient's health, cannot be 'wrong' when he utters statements?

That's a fascinating claim.

"Bob," says the doctor, "you are a bachelor AND a married man."

And, if the doctor is RIGHT to not argue semantics and focus on Bob's health, then Bob's doctor is not WRONG in making that statement?

Are you sure that's what you want to claim?

Personally, I would say that right and wrong, when applied 'morally' regarding what Bob's doctor should or should not be doing, would be an entirely different matter from whether Bob's doctor is making false statements or not.

But I'm crazy that way.

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I'm wondering how many people looked up the definition of hypochondria!..lol..

If you're using the definition of hypochondria given in the story...then you'd have to say the doctor is WRONG. Bob repeatedly believes he has this condition, yet the doctor tells him no.

I could be wrong but I'm just going by what was given in the story.

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