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more weird words ...

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Again, brain teasers of sorts ...

[1] what is the longest English word that contains a single, unrepeated vowel?

[2] give 2 9-letter words that have 1 syllable.

[3] give a word that has 5 consecutive vowels.

[4] give 2 words that have 5 consecutive consonants.

[5] give a word that has 6 consecutive consonants

[6] give 2 words that have the 6 vowels a e i o u y in alphabetical order

[7] give a word that has 6 occurrences of the same vowel.

and finally, the one you were waiting for cuz everyone knows it ...

[8] give a word that has three consecutive repeated letters.

answers appended this weekend.

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53 answers to this question

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Posted · Report post

Nice breakdown. B))

So ... in "rhythm" and related words,

the consonants "r" and "th" partly obstruct the breath; "h" is silent; and "y" is left to provide the vowel sound.

When I went to grammer school (45 years ago!) We were taught that it was "A_E_I_O_U and sometimes Y and then other teachers would come along and make it "Sometimes Y an W! personally I have always thought You could make a weak case for "H" as well! :wacko:

Side Pocket

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Posted · Report post

When I went to grammer school (45 years ago!) We were taught that it was "A_E_I_O_U and sometimes Y and then other teachers would come along and make it "Sometimes Y an W! personally I have always thought You could make a weak case for "H" as well! :wacko:

Side Pocket

Well,I get that you went 45 years ago,because,it's spelled GRAMMAR. :)

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Posted · Report post

I got #3... Its sequoia... wait... CRAP... this is a tree, and it has every vowel (except y if thats included...) and its cool

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#7 - pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (9 o's, 6 i's) Yes, it is a word.

a lung disease caused by the intake of silicon from an erupted volcano

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Posted · Report post

For number 4 and yet a 4th -

lengths

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1) senescene

2) strengths

4) angsts

6) facetiously

8 bookkeeper

Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

actually

#1 cant be senescene because it has to have a single non repeated vowel

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Posted (edited) · Report post

6) adventitiously

7) indivisibility, following the last hint, or indivisibilities which has 7

Edited by Catpie
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Posted · Report post

#8 -Tallahassee if you want to count it as a word.

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Posted · Report post

There is one word of which I know which contains the vowels a, e, i, o and u once each only, but in reverse alphabetical order. What is more I have actually seen the word used in The Times.

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Posted · Report post

There is one word of which I know which contains the vowels a, e, i, o and u once each only, but in reverse alphabetical order. What is more I have actually seen the word used in The Times.

Common ones:

subcontinental

uncomplimentary

unnoticeably

Not so common ones:

duoliteral

muroidea

muscoidea

pulmonifera

subhyoidean

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Posted · Report post

Common ones:

subcontinental

uncomplimentary

unnoticeably

Not so common ones:

duoliteral

muroidea

muscoidea

pulmonifera

subhyoidean

That really is an impressive list. Many thanks.

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Even if "subbookkeeper" were a word, which I am most sure it is not a word of common English usage, it would be hyphenated as

sub-bookkeeper to be grammatically correct.

What does grammar have to do with it? Whether it's hyphenated or not doesn't change the meaning. Hyphenation would simply allow quicker identification, and avoid confusion with similar words where sub- was not a prefix. (Examples?)

And if it needs to be hyphenated, you could make a case that bookkeeper should be "book-keeper" or even "book keeper" (ignoring the common usage card).

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I think the rule for counting "y" as a vowel is that it makes the sound of a vowel, and it adds a syllable to the word.

rhyth·mics has two syllables, and the first syllable is formed by the sound of the y.

Rhythm has 2 syllables, so is 'm' a vowel too? :)

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Again, brain teasers of sorts ...

[3] COOEEING

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Posted · Report post

[5] latchstring

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Posted · Report post

3) queueing

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Posted · Report post

3)queueing

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Posted · Report post

3 can also be cooeeing but that is not a very known word so the answer is probably referring to queueuing

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I know this is old, but I had to state this. Subbookkeeper is in fact a real word (even tho Firefox's internal spell check is debating this as I type...).

http://www.definition-of.com/subbookkeeper

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Posted · Report post

i dunno. subbookkeeper sounds perfectly kromulent to me.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I know this is old, but I had to state this. Subbookkeeper is in fact a real word (even tho Firefox's internal spell check is debating this as I type...).

http://www.definitio...m/subbookkeeper

Same website also has "subterrific" and "terrificy". And has "subperb" in for "superb"! I get the inpression that it's words these people wish were in the language.

Edited by fabpig
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Posted · Report post

#2 Squirrels

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Posted · Report post

Y isnt a vowel?

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3) queueing

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