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complete the sequences


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Fill in an answer that continues the patterns: (there may be more than one correct answer for each)

A) 0111 01101111 1110 011011011111 0011111111111100 ?

B) A L E J ?

C) C L M ?

D) AEIIEAAEI AEIA AEIEAEEI AEII AEAIA EAEIIEEAEE ?

I'll post answers in a while if no one gets them.

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Ok. Hints.

Hmmm. I think hints give them away, but here goes.

A) Hint: The pattern has nothing to do with the number or order of the 1's and 0's. What is left?

Huge Hint: Ratio. Look at the ratio of 1's to 0's.

B) Hint: Yo-yo's and primes.

Huge Hint: If the alphabet were lined up from top to bottom and assigned normal numbers, like A=1 B=2, what happens to this sequence?

C) Hint: Line up the alphabet over and over again with numbers until you hit 100. Like A= 1, 27, 53 & 79; B = 2, 28, 54 & 80, etc.

Huge Hint: What is the distance from one letter to the next if you line them up and count the "numbers" descending from A=1? What would the next "number" be and it's corresponding letter?

D) Hint: Again, has nothing to do with the number or order of the letters. What is left?

Huge Hint: Ratio. Look at the ratio of letters. What would come next?

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Well, either nobody could get these or nobody wanted to post, so here are the answers as promised:

Fill in an answer that continues the patterns: (there may be more than one correct answer for each)

A) 0111 01101111 1110 011011011111 0011111111111100 ?

The pattern uses ratios of 0 to 1. It goes 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3 -- Get it? Any answer of 0's and 1's in a 1:3 ratio is correct.

B) A L E J ?

This pattern uses a-z letters assigned numbers 1 - 26 where a =1 and z = 26. It uses prime numbers to "yo yo" from a. A to L = 11. L to E = 7. E to J = 5. So the next in line is 3 up from J, or G.

C) C L M ?

This pattern assigns numbers sequentially to A - Z repeating. The pattern is factors of 3 added to the one before, so 3=C, then 3 + 3*3 or 12=L, then 12+ 3*3*3 or 39 = M, so next is 39 + 3*3*3*3 or 39 + 81 = 120 which would = P

D) AEIIEAAEI AEIA AEIEAEEI AEII AEAIA EAEIIEEAEE ?

This again uses ratios. A to E to I. 1:1:1, then A 2:1, E 2:1, I 2:1, then A 3:1, E 3:1, so the next needs to be I 3:1. Any combination that has 3 I's for every one A and E works. For example, IIIAE

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The first and last aren't technically sequences

In order for a proper sequence there nees to be defined parameters and rules in order to come up with a specific value or character.

In these there were several answers that could be used as a possible answer , but what you could have done was actually have a sequence with a sequence.

e.g.

0111 10111011 110111011101...

then the next would definately be 1110111011101110

I did think that the 2nd and third sequences were very good though. I couldn't get them until the hints were given.

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The first and last aren't technically sequences

In order for a proper sequence there nees to be defined parameters and rules in order to come up with a specific value or character.

I respectfully disagree. The parameters DID exist to limit the responses to a finite set of answers, all with a common value or character. A ratio set is completely valid and particular enough to work as a sequence, most especially number 4 where the ratio was VERY specific in that it had to be 3:1 using a particular letter. I don't understand why you think a sequence must equal a finite answer set of 1.

For example, if we are walking down a street playing a game where you are trying to figure out my pattern, and I point to a building, a bush, a person, another building, another bush, and then ask you complete it, you don't need to point to Mr. Henry standing at 42nd and J streets. You just need to point to something with enough common parameters to make the sequence valid - i.e. a human being, regardless of race, sex, etc. Now if I narrowed the parameters to include only males as a potential answer (for example if I had been alternating the gender of the people and it was now time for a male) then the appropriate set of answers would be limited to only males on the street. In A) there is a definite set of parameters in that you must use 0's and 1's and you must have a 3:1 ratio of 1's to 0's. Nothing else works, therefore any valid answer IS part of a valid sequence.

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I respectfully disagree. The parameters DID exist to limit the responses to a finite set of answers, all with a common value or character. A ratio set is completely valid and particular enough to work as a sequence, most especially number 4 where the ratio was VERY specific in that it had to be 3:1 using a particular letter. I don't understand why you think a sequence must equal a finite answer set of 1.

For example, if we are walking down a street playing a game where you are trying to figure out my pattern, and I point to a building, a bush, a person, another building, another bush, and then ask you complete it, you don't need to point to Mr. Henry standing at 42nd and J streets. You just need to point to something with enough common parameters to make the sequence valid - i.e. a human being, regardless of race, sex, etc. Now if I narrowed the parameters to include only males as a potential answer (for example if I had been alternating the gender of the people and it was now time for a male) then the appropriate set of answers would be limited to only males on the street. In A) there is a definite set of parameters in that you must use 0's and 1's and you must have a 3:1 ratio of 1's to 0's. Nothing else works, therefore any valid answer IS part of a valid sequence.

With this logic, I could give you a "sequence" of random letters and ask you to give me the next one. Then, according to you, the answer would be ANY letter, so long as it was a letter.

To ask for the "next" in the sequence, implies there is a unique solution. If you were to ask for an example that would fit the solution, would imply the answer must be within a set. In my example above, the "set" would be any letter.

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I respectfully disagree. The parameters DID exist to limit the responses to a finite set of answers, all with a common value or character. A ratio set is completely valid and particular enough to work as a sequence, most especially number 4 where the ratio was VERY specific in that it had to be 3:1 using a particular letter. I don't understand why you think a sequence must equal a finite answer set of 1.

For example, if we are walking down a street playing a game where you are trying to figure out my pattern, and I point to a building, a bush, a person, another building, another bush, and then ask you complete it, you don't need to point to Mr. Henry standing at 42nd and J streets. You just need to point to something with enough common parameters to make the sequence valid - i.e. a human being, regardless of race, sex, etc. Now if I narrowed the parameters to include only males as a potential answer (for example if I had been alternating the gender of the people and it was now time for a male) then the appropriate set of answers would be limited to only males on the street. In A) there is a definite set of parameters in that you must use 0's and 1's and you must have a 3:1 ratio of 1's to 0's. Nothing else works, therefore any valid answer IS part of a valid sequence.

hm...don't you think that the number of variants in your first sequence will be infinite...

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