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Pears

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The Plural would refer to two sets of pears whilst, the riddle is simply saying their are no pairs meaning two sets of pairs ut their is indeed a pair of pears

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the pears blew to another tree and got stuck in the branches la-duh

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The riddle never specified how long after the wind storm; someone came and picked up the pears that blew off the tree in the wind. Picking up "wind fallen" fruit is a common farming practice, in fact, the term "windfall" originated from that scenario.

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Ok people. At the beginning, they say there are a FEW trees. So, when they say there aren't any pears left on THE tree, they could be talking about any of the trees. They didn't say the AFOREMENTIONED tree WITH PEARS ON IT or anything like that. OR maybe the pears flew from one tree into another... It could happen...

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You guys are making this too complicated. The riddle lies in realizing that there were 2 PEARS in the tree before the storm. After the storm, there were no longer PEARS in the tree because there were 2 PEARS before, and now there is 1 PEAR in the tree. There also aren't PEARS on the ground because there is only 1 PEAR on the ground. Nothing is lost in translation, and there is no difference in typing or speaking this riddle. PEARS =/= PEAR. And foley, I realize this is what you were arguing against, but there are many riddles set up like this, where slight differences in words will give you the correct answer, even if it is a slight grammar thing.

larryhl is right, this riddle actually makes perfect sense exactly as it is. Saying there were "pears" in the tree before the wind came along implies that there were at least two (which we find out in the solution that there were just that many). If, after the wind, there was one in the tree and one on the ground then it is correct to assume that there weren't "pears" (more than one) on the ground or on the tree, because there was only a PEAR in each place. The whole point of a riddle is to use language in a complicated/tricky way so as to confuse the mind of the person attempting to solve said riddle. It doesn't mean that the use of the language is incorrect.

Also, the riddle doesn't say "there were NO pears" as many of you keep quoting in your arguments; it says, "there were NEITHER pears on the tree NOR on the ground" which means that both of those places had less than two pears. If people insist on getting bent out of shape about the use of language, let's forget about the pear vs. pears and look at the last line of the riddle: "How come?" Now, you want to talk about a grammar faux pas? It should read, "Why not?"

Exactly. I don't see how this came to be so complicated --EXCEPT when people began changing the words. And aren't puzzles usually all about the wording?!

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Posted · Report post

obviously its pears as in 2 each, the wind came and blew until there were no more pairs

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There are pears on some tree in a garden. Due to the wind there are no pears on the tree nor on the ground.

One explanation:

As some said above, 2 pears on the tree, one fell on the ground and one remained on the tree hence no pears (only a pear on the tree and the ground.)

Second explanation:

There is a bush below the pear tree in which the pears get caught or a person with a basket standing below it and catching the pears as they fall.

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Posted · Report post

So simple. They are on the roof of the house(s) that are under the trees branches

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THIS RIDDLE MAKES NO SENSE!

Alright, let me take a crack at it guys.....

The confusing part about this riddle is the word Pear. As you can see above there has been some talk about its ability to be placed FAIRLY in text. Reason being, it is more a PLAY ON WORDS then it is a riddle.

Example = You have a "pear" that you eat. FRUIT...

Example2= You have a "Pair" of socks. PLURAL...

The question states that there are PEARS on the tree, but once the wind came there were no longer PEARS on the tree OR on the ground... HOW COME???

Problem with the question is, if you typed it properly, THERE WOULD BE NO QUESTION. So you HAVE to trick the reader in order for it to HAVE THE PROPER EFFECT. Problem with that is "If this is a Problem Solving Forum, you need to give an Accurate Problem" This riddle is IMPOSSIBLE to TYPE, It must be Spoken in order to work. Other wise the question would be as follows:

There are a Pair of Pears on a Pear tree...lol After a wind blew, there were No Longer a Pair of Pears on the tree... WHY? Of coarse the answer would be: BECAUSE ONLY ONE FELL OFF, LEAVING ONE PEAR ONE THE TREE, AND ONE PAIR ON THE GROUND, ELIMINATING ANY PAIRS OF ANYTHING, ANYWHERE.....

If that doesn't do it, I don't know what to tell ya....

-= Veracity =-

Exactly!

Simply put: at first there were pears (plural) on the tree, namely two. In the end there were no pears (plural) on the tree, nor on the ground, because there was only A PEAR (singular) on the tree, and A PEAR (singular) on the ground.

BoilingOil

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Don't you guys think you're getting a bit too in depth with the syntax analyzing? Someone already guessed an answer that seems correct to me (about the PEARS -lol- being in the basket) without any complaints about the wording or spelling... It just seems as though you're all overthinking it, and in the process, losing the spirit of the whole thing...

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Posted · Report post

It takes two pear trees to have fruit.

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It was winter, so there were pears on the tree, but the winter took them off. (Also, it being winter time would explain the strong wind...)

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it was falling.

i agree with this

They have not hit the ground yet, so they are still falling.

OR

The strong wind was a tornado and the pears were still with the tornado.

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<!-- s:twisted: --><!-- s:twisted: --> the garden was not on the ground it was elevated and the pears were in the garden.

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My answer is: the wind was so strong that it blew the entire tree away, and the pears with it.

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Usually, I stop once I reach the simplest feasible answer: the wind blew all the pears off the tree, over a cliff, and into the water (perhaps the tree went as well; this is some strong wind we're talking about).

But maybe it wasn't until months later, when all the pears had fallen off the tree and rotted, when a "strong wind blew".

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Posted · Report post

WhAT iF the wInd bLeW the tr33 of the GroUnd with The peArs sTiLl in it??????????

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i love it when people over-analyze. 2 pears in the tree to start, 1 fell, 1 stayed. there is only one pear on the ground and in the tree, so no pears in the plural form, just a single pear at each location.

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Posted · Report post

it says there are few trees one is a pear tree. the tree that the wind blew on was not nessarly the tree with pears

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i dont get it...where did the frigin pears go?...i want some pears! do you have any pears? i like pears.

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Posted · Report post

they bew into the other trees

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Posted · Report post

do trees grow in gardens?

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A tornado pulled the pears of the tree with a storng wind, it then pulled them into the sky, placeing them someplace else.

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The pears were picked off by someone.

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ANSWER?

The pears are still on the pear tree? In any good riddle one must take into account EVERY word. At the beginning of the riddle, it says there were a few trees in the garden. Well let's say there were 2 trees, an apple tree and a pear tree with pears. At the end it says there were no pears on the tree. Which tree? If they were talking about the apple tree, then there were no pears on that tree nor the ground because the pears were never blown off of the pear tree. ;-)

Nick

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