Jump to content
BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers
  • 0

Impossible math 2


Guest

Question

1 = sqrrt(1) = sqrrt((-1)(-1)) = sqrrt(-1)sqrrt(-1) = -1

The way I wrote out the words may be a bit confusing but go figure anyway.

What is the flaw with this?

What is sqrrt(1)?

A square root really has two possible values. This makes the equation sqrrt(ab) = sqrrt(a)sqrrt(B) true only where a and b are positive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

14 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

There is no such thing in the real world as the square root of -1.

So leaving aside imaginaery numbers, the equation should be

1 = sqrt(1)

1 = 1 * 1 or

1 = -1 * -1

Which does not prove the origianl sum. Sorry.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
There is no such thing in the real world as the square root of -1.

Are you saying it doesn't exist? Because there is a button for it right here on my calculator. If you meant to say real numbers than just skip the puzzles with complex numbers and spend some more time not watching MTV.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

right - I didn't have to because I limited my explication the math concept I used. However it is saying the same thing in the end: there are two possible values and therefore we need limit the scope of certain rules.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Comperr,

Sorry mate but you are wrong on this one.

You can't say that the sqrt of -1 is -1 if you do not include the imanginary i in the formula... You just can't!

However, I have seen this:

0 = 0+0+0+0...

= (1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+... [to infinity]

= 1+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+... [there will always be another +/- to pair with]

= 1+0+0+0+0+0...

= 1

You can therefore get m=0=n, where n and m are any real or imaginary number.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

nice... of course the flaw is the "infinity" part, which corresponds to the "light switch supertask paradox" centered around aleph-null and that scientists dont know if an event has occured even or odd times when it reaches aleph-null (infinity)... well i cant explain it very well but its one of Martin Gardner's books

nick, that was a good use of the aleph-null paradox!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I actually posted this elsewhere. And I am not wrong by the way with the math. The idea behind most zero based math are the rules that change things for zero. Same thing with negatives. The false math uses the global rules ignoring the exceptions. Your problem with my math is the fact that I ignored an exception. I recommend you read a few books on false math.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Comperr,

Sorry mate but you are wrong on this one.

You can't say that the sqrt of -1 is -1 if you do not include the imanginary i in the formula... You just can't!

However, I have seen this:

0 = 0+0+0+0...

= (1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+... [to infinity]

= 1+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+... [there will always be another +/- to pair with]

= 1+0+0+0+0+0...

= 1

You can therefore get m=0=n, where n and m are any real or imaginary number.

Cool! If anyone didn't know about aleph-null, this would sure baffle 'em!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...