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Impossible math 2

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1 = sqrrt(1) = sqrrt((-1)(-1)) = sqrrt(-1)sqrrt(-1) = -1

The way I wrote out the words may be a bit confusing but go figure anyway.

What is the flaw with this?

What is sqrrt(1)?

A square root really has two possible values. This makes the equation sqrrt(ab) = sqrrt(a)sqrrt(B) true only where a and b are positive.

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Posted · Report post

tricky solution gud one

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Posted · Report post

There is no such thing in the real world as the square root of -1.

So leaving aside imaginaery numbers, the equation should be

1 = sqrt(1)

1 = 1 * 1 or

1 = -1 * -1

Which does not prove the origianl sum. Sorry.

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Posted · Report post

There is no such thing in the real world as the square root of -1.

Are you saying it doesn't exist? Because there is a button for it right here on my calculator. If you meant to say real numbers than just skip the puzzles with complex numbers and spend some more time not watching MTV.

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Posted · Report post

normdeplume is right. There is no square of a negative because every value squared makes a positive.

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Posted · Report post

the sqrrt of a negative number is called imaginary. sqrrt(-1) = i

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Posted · Report post

i will use V for square root symbol

V(-1) = i

V(-2) = 2i

V(-500) = 500i

so on

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Posted · Report post

Actually, it's not like that.

sqrt(-9) = +3i NOTE: + is the "plus or minus" symbol.

sqrt(-81) = +9i

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Posted · Report post

Did you see my spoilers with the answer? I already said this.

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Posted · Report post

Huh? You didn't say anything about square roots of negative numbers!?

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Posted · Report post

right - I didn't have to because I limited my explication the math concept I used. However it is saying the same thing in the end: there are two possible values and therefore we need limit the scope of certain rules.

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Posted · Report post

Comperr,

Sorry mate but you are wrong on this one.

You can't say that the sqrt of -1 is -1 if you do not include the imanginary i in the formula... You just can't!

However, I have seen this:

0 = 0+0+0+0...

= (1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+... [to infinity]

= 1+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+... [there will always be another +/- to pair with]

= 1+0+0+0+0+0...

= 1

You can therefore get m=0=n, where n and m are any real or imaginary number.

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Posted · Report post

nice... of course the flaw is the "infinity" part, which corresponds to the "light switch supertask paradox" centered around aleph-null and that scientists dont know if an event has occured even or odd times when it reaches aleph-null (infinity)... well i cant explain it very well but its one of Martin Gardner's books

nick, that was a good use of the aleph-null paradox!

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Posted · Report post

I actually posted this elsewhere. And I am not wrong by the way with the math. The idea behind most zero based math are the rules that change things for zero. Same thing with negatives. The false math uses the global rules ignoring the exceptions. Your problem with my math is the fact that I ignored an exception. I recommend you read a few books on false math.

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Posted · Report post

Comperr,

Sorry mate but you are wrong on this one.

You can't say that the sqrt of -1 is -1 if you do not include the imanginary i in the formula... You just can't!

However, I have seen this:

0 = 0+0+0+0...

= (1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+... [to infinity]

= 1+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+... [there will always be another +/- to pair with]

= 1+0+0+0+0+0...

= 1

You can therefore get m=0=n, where n and m are any real or imaginary number.

Cool! If anyone didn't know about aleph-null, this would sure baffle 'em!

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