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If the universe was created by the big bang, then what created that?

If the big bang was created by the previous universe collapsing in on its self then what created that?

etc...

If God created all this then where did god come from?

Eternal means no end and no beginning, how can anything, including God, be eternal?

Only nothing is eternal and infinite and therefore we are all nothing.

How can the universe be infinitely large and infinitely small at the same time? It is impossible unless we are nothing.

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If the universe was created by the big bang, then what created that?

If the big bang was created by the previous universe collapsing in on its self then what created that?

etc...

If God created all this then where did god come from?

Eternal means no end and no beginning, how can anything, including God, be eternal?

Only nothing is eternal and infinite and therefore we are all nothing.

How can the universe be infinitely large and infinitely small at the same time? It is impossible unless we are nothing.

Interesting questions, indeed. What leads you to believe that the universe is both infinitely large and small? I can't speak for you, but I would be willing to wager that I'm not nothing. You wanna take me up on that? :P

The concept of eternity is directly connected with time, which we know to be a property of the physical universe. Since time would likely not exist prior to the Big Bang (unless the previously imploded universe had time), then what does it even mean to say that the universe, the energy which spawned the universe, or the God that created the universe is "eternal"? Gets a bit fuzzier if you take time out of the picture, doesn't it?

Such discussion often arises in response to the cosmological argument, which basically uses the questions you raised as an argument for why there had to be something that didn't have a beginning, thereby implying that it's logical to question whether or not that "First Cause" was likely to be an intelligent designer. Opponents of the argument suggest that it's meaningless to talk about things which are eternal, or even the need for a beginning, if there's no time, since every concept of causality we observe is connected with time (if action A causes outcome B, then by definition B had to happen after A). It's certainly a tough one to get our heads around. Mathematically, it's easier to describe the world with more dimensions, not less, and we don't really have a good way to think about causality without the fourth dimension.

While all this speculative babbling is good brain food, I personally don't think it really changes the appropriateness of the question: How did it all get here in the first place? If you are satisfied with the answer: "It was always here," without any evidence for that conclusion, then it seems reasonable to consider the idea that what "was always here" was something more than just a freak conglomeration of energy which happened to result in generating intelligent life. Of course, not everyone agrees. :)

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