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Moving faster.

yes, but there specifics on how you move and your speed. Be more specific.

Edited by giterdone

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How are you defining aging slower? There is nothing you can do to make yourself age slower than normal. There are things you can do to make yourself age slower in relation to your surroundings, but it doesn't change you.

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How are you defining aging slower? There is nothing you can do to make yourself age slower than normal. There are things you can do to make yourself age slower in relation to your surroundings, but it doesn't change you.

good. His theory was that you age slower in relation to your surroundings if you move faster. There is no way to actually age slower completely.

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General relativty answer:

Move to a location with lower gravitational potential.

is the effect of time passing at different rates in regions of different gravitational potential.

The higher the local distortion of spacetime due to gravity, the slower time passes.

Albert Einstein originally predicted this effect in his theory of relativity and it has since been confirmed by tests of general relativity.

This has been demonstrated by noting that atomic clocks at differing altitudes

(and thus different gravitational potential) will eventually show different times.

The effects detected in such experiments are extremely small,

with differences being measured in nanoseconds.

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General relativty answer:

Move to a location with lower gravitational potential.

is the effect of time passing at different rates in regions of different gravitational potential.

The higher the local distortion of spacetime due to gravity, the slower time passes.

Albert Einstein originally predicted this effect in his theory of relativity and it has since been confirmed by tests of general relativity.

yes. He also had a scenario involving running, a train, and a plane.

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Or with special relativity, just from increasing your speed. Instead of the constant "downward" force, apply it in a direction and that also works.

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yes. He also had a scenario involving running, a train, and a plane.

Forget planes, trains and automobiles, cuz we already did special relativity. But don't forget John Candy.

Anyway, to the point ...

In special relativity, the time dilation effect is reciprocal:

as observed from the point of view of any two clocks which are in motion

with respect to each other, it will be the other party's clock that is time dilated.

In contrast, gravitational time dilation is not reciprocal:

an observer at the top of a tower will observe that clocks at ground level tick slower,

and observers on the ground will agree.

Thus gravitational time dilation is agreed upon by all observers, independent of their altitude.

Hey, it was your question. ;)

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But there is also merit in saying a way of aging slower is to move faster, whether or not Einstein said it. It can be observed that elderly people tend to do be more healthy and are more alert if they are physically active. If they lead a sedentary lifestyle it appears that they are more likely to develop problems associated with those things. So if you want to age slower than those around you, move faster than them :).

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