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An answer to the abstract is yes.

An equation is an expression that evaluates to a certain value or set of values.
A formula is an equation in which uses a set of variables to show there exists a relationship between the variables used in the expression.
Let X(R(S)) represent a function of an expression such that S is the set of variables used by the expression and R(S) is the function that expresses the relationship of those variables.
Let Y represent the result or set of results of the equation. Then,
Y = X(R(S)) could be a formula for each and every existing mathematics equation.

 

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If   E=mc2  and F=ma  are correct equations then these can be merge via certain methods as follow:

E+F =mc2 +ma  or

E-F =mc2 - ma or  

E-ma =mc2 -F or

EF=ac2m3 or 

F/E =a/c2  

To make it easier, you can do any operation with one side of equation 2 to one side of equation 1

as long as you do the same with other side of equation 2 to the other side of equation 1. More equations

means more number of ways to merge them in single equation or formulation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 3/17/2016 at 2:24 PM, Brainy Binary said:

If   E=mc2  and F=ma  are correct equations then these can be merge via certain methods as follow:

E+F =mc2 +ma  or

E-F =mc2 - ma or  

E-ma =mc2 -F or

EF=ac2m3 or 

F/E =a/c2  

To make it easier, you can do any operation with one side of equation 2 to one side of equation 1

as long as you do the same with other side of equation 2 to the other side of equation 1. More equations

means more number of ways to merge them in single equation or formulation.

If E=mc2 and F=ma then you can say E/c2 = F/a but not much more.

E+F has no meaning. You can't meaningfully add two things that are not measures of the same quantity, like the energy it takes to melt a gram of ice and the force it takes to type the letter F on your computer keyboard. Or the number, in dozens, of apples in basket A and the elapsed time, in centuries, since the oranges in basket B were picked.

It would make as much sense to say that the knowledge contained in all the books of the world could be preserved in a single book comprising a string of all their first words then all their second words and so forth. In a way, it's all there in a single book, but the destruction of syntax and context destroys meaning and knowledge as well.

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