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Particle detectors

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A detector with largest flat surface is to be installed
inside a lab cubicle that has 1 sq.m opening and 1m
deep underground to maximize capture of particles.

Is the shape of detector a square or a circle?

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Posted · Report post

Is the opening a square that is 1 meter on a side?
Can the opening take the shape of the detector?

My guess is a both the opening and the detector should be circles, but it's not clear that both shapes are variable.

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Posted · Report post

Is the opening a square that is 1 meter on a side?

Can the opening take the shape of the detector?

My guess is a both the opening and the detector should be circles, but it's not clear that both shapes are variable.

the buried cube is 1x1x1m metal box without cover on top

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Posted · Report post

Where will the detector be placed? Sorry i think i haven't understood clearly.


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Posted · Report post

Where will the detector be placed? Sorry i think i haven't understood clearly.

please install inside the (cube) box without exposure above the ground

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Posted · Report post

you made the detector a square along the diagonal of the cube?

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Posted · Report post

you made the detector a square along the diagonal of the cube?

That is 1 x 1 m only because the side is 1 m, there is a larger square that will fit in the cube.

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Posted · Report post

you made the detector a square along the diagonal of the cube?

That is 1 x 1 m only because the side is 1 m, there is a larger square that will fit in the cube.

The detector would be sqrt(2) x sqrt(2)

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Posted · Report post

you made the detector a square along the diagonal of the cube?

That is 1 x 1 m only because the side is 1 m, there is a larger square that will fit in the cube.

The detector would be sqrt(2) x sqrt(2)

Oops ignore that...

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Posted · Report post

which is larger..the biggest square that fits in a cube or the biggest circle that fits in a cube?

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Posted · Report post

which is larger..the biggest square that fits in a cube or the biggest circle that fits in a cube?

Prince Rupert

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Posted · Report post

which is larger..the biggest square that fits in a cube or the biggest circle that fits in a cube?

Prince Rupert

AutoCAD

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I strongly dislike AutoCAD :D so many rough memories

which is larger..the biggest square that fits in a cube or the biggest circle that fits in a cube?

Prince Rupert

AutoCAD

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Posted · Report post

A square with area 9/8.

It's easy to see the square of a side is (3/4)2 + (3/4)2.

post-1048-0-45311000-1366523298_thumb.gi

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Posted · Report post

one surface area to go...

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Posted · Report post

I didn't say, but it seems obvious that

if you make the detector a circle, you throw away area needlessly.

The constraint for a circle to fit does not preclude adding corners to it.

So a circular shape is always suboptimal.

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Posted · Report post

I didn't say, but it seems obvious that

if you make the detector a circle, you throw away area needlessly.

The constraint for a circle to fit does not preclude adding corners to it.

So a circular shape is always suboptimal.

that is, if the circle is inside the square..

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Posted · Report post

I didn't say, but it seems obvious that

if you make the detector a circle, you throw away area needlessly.

The constraint for a circle to fit does not preclude adding corners to it.

So a circular shape is always suboptimal.

that is, if the circle is inside the square..

assures the detector is inside a cube.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

or rather Post 5 does that ;) .. no exposure above ground actually means that no part of the circle or square can be : "out-of-the-box" so to speak...

Edited by Yodell
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Posted · Report post

ok, why is a circular detector bigger than the square detector ?

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ok, why is a circular detector bigger than the square detector ?

Circles aren't bigger or smaller than squares until constraints are added.

  1. If the constraint is a given perimeter, circles are bigger (area wise)
  2. If the constraint is maximum and minimum values of x and y, then squares are bigger.

The present constraints are of the second type.

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Posted · Report post

...inside a cube the largest square that can fit in is not coplanar with the largest circle that can fit in.

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Posted · Report post

post-53237-0-27552900-1369130712_thumb.j

inscribed in bobby go's regular hex cut lies the biggest circle within the cube..

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