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I got this idea from brhan's sequence.

A set of numbers is given below:

1,2,3,2,1,2,3,4,2,1

Another set of numbers is given below:

8,4,12,4,8,4,12,2,4,8

There is a certain relationship between these two sets of numbers.Can you find the relationship? ;)

If nobody finds an answer I will post a hint. :)

For newbies , please post your answer inside spoilers.

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Posted · Report post

The easy answer is that 1 corresponds with 8, 2 with 4, 3 with 12, and 4 with 2. That is the relationship.

I'm not wrong, but still not what you wanted i think.

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Posted · Report post

One that I think is more what you had in mind...

It works for all except the 3rd to last term... But 8/x. I know it's not completely right so i'm still hammering out some other variations.

Is this close at all to what you want? Or am i going completely the wrong direction.

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Posted · Report post

One that I think is more what you had in mind...

It works for all except the 3rd to last term... But 8/x. I know it's not completely right so i'm still hammering out some other variations.

Is this close at all to what you want? Or am i going completely the wrong direction.

Sorry.No , what i have in mind is something different.

Try of converting the first Set of nos. into second set or vice-versa.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Come on , guys and gals.Please do post some answers.Do I have to give a hint?

Edited by grey cells
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Posted · Report post

Do not think in terms of very complex formulae

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Posted · Report post

I think I have it.

0 -> 0

Oops. Nope. My answer would make 4 -> 8.

Still thinking.

Does a clock help?

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Posted · Report post

I think I have it.

Still thinking.

Does a clock help?

0 -> 0
Oops. Nope. My answer would make 4 -> 8.

My reasoning is something different.

a different base

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Posted (edited) · Report post

a different base(Hexadecimal)

Edited by grey cells
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Posted · Report post

A set of numbers is given below:

1,2,3,2,1,2,3,4,2,1

Another set of numbers is given below:

8,4,12,4,8,4,12,2,4,8

There is a certain relationship between these two sets of numbers.Can you find the relationship? ;)

I think this one is difficult. Dono which direction to go .... -_-

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Posted · Report post

a different base(Hexadecimal)
That makes 12[hex] = 18[decimal] the others are the same in hex or decimal.


2 -> 4
3 -> 18
4 -> 2
1 ->  8
I'm missing something. Or perhaps the OP is missing a "decimal" point, and the relationship is

8/2 -> 4
8/3 -> 1.8[hex] -> 2.666[dec] ... kind of? [nah]
8/4 -> 2
8/1 ->  8

I'll wait for the answer.

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Posted · Report post

A huge SORRY to everyone who have tried to solve this one . I made a very , very silly mistake. I found my mistake only when I went through Bonanova's , reply.

CLARIFICATION:

First set:

1,2,3,2,1,2,3,4,2,1

Second set:

8,4,C,4,8,4,C,2,4,8

Again sorry!!! :blush:

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I got this idea from brhan's sequence.

A set of numbers is given below:

1,2,3,2,1,2,3,4,2,1

Another set of numbers is given below:

8,4,12,4,8,4,12,2,4,8

There is a certain relationship between these two sets of numbers.Can you find the relationship? ;)

If nobody finds an answer I will post a hint. :)

For newbies , please post your answer inside spoilers.

Well, the first is a pattern of numbers that go up to three, then back to one, then up to four then skips three and goes back to one.

The second kinda goes with that pattern, but 8 replace 1, 4 replaces 2, 12 replaces 3, and 2 replaces 4.

Uhhh... that's about as far as I get.

With bases...

the first set would remain the same. Octet.. quartet.. binary? The four and two replace each other for some reason.

=/ I'm not so good at these things, guess I will have to wait for the answer as well.

Edited by PhoenixTears
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Posted (edited) · Report post

The second series numbers are binary reverse of first series numbers.. if you consider four binary digits..

for example:

1=0001, in reverse order 1000=8

2=0010, in reverse order 0100=4

3=0011, in reverse order 1100=12(C )

4=0100, in reverse order 0010=2

12 is also ok!Excellent puzzle!! <_<

Edited by storm
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Posted (edited) · Report post

The second series numbers are binary reverse of first series numbers.. if you consider four digits..

for example:

1=0001, in reverse order 1000=8

2=0010, in reverse order 0100=4

3=0011, in reverse order 1100=12

4=0100, in reverse order 0010=2

Excellent puzzle!! <_<

Thanks Storm.And congrats You got the answer.But you also made the same mistake I made.

1100=C not 12.

But you reasoned it out first.So congratulations.

Edited by grey cells
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Posted (edited) · Report post

12 is also ok!Excellent puzzle!! <_<

The second series numbers are binary reverse of first series numbers.. if you consider four binary digits..

for example:

1=0001, in reverse order 1000=8

2=0010, in reverse order 0100=4

3=0011, in reverse order 1100=12(C )

4=0100, in reverse order 0010=2

Sorry storm no offence meant.I only posted it bacause Bononova and brhan must have spent a considerable trying to solve this.So thanks sgain. :)

Edited by grey cells
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Posted · Report post

Thanks Storm.And congrats You got the answer.But you also made the same mistake I made.
1100=C not 12.
But you reasoned it out first.So congratulations.

It can be considered also as 12..becoz..

In decimal..1100 is 12...why worry?

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Posted · Report post

It can be considered also as 12..becoz..
In decimal..1100 is 12...why worry?

I agree with you.But I gave a clue relating to hexadecimal system.

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Posted · Report post

It can be considered also as 12..becoz..
In decimal..1100 is 12...why worry?

Storm, totally agree.

Gray cells, great puzzle.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Storm, totally agree.

Gray cells, great puzzle.

Thanks , bononova.But still I am not entirely in the clear.If it is hex how can 12 be equal to 1100.

Edited by grey cells
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Posted · Report post

Thanks , bononova.But still I am not entirely in the clear.If it is hex how can 12 be equal to 1100.

I see your point, after giving a clue about hex.

But the original numbers [in decimal] work ok, right?

C[hex] and 12[dec] are both 1100[bin].

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I see your point, after giving a clue about hex.

But the original numbers [in decimal] work ok, right?

C[hex] and 12[dec] are both 1100[bin].

Yes . They are the same in decimal.But not in hex.In hex , if I am not mistaken 12=10010. :)

Edited by grey cells
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