Perfect number

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Posted · Report post

Perfect numbers are number whose sum of factors are twice the number itself.

Example

1. 6 factors of 6 are 1,2,3 and 6 sum=12 i.e 2 * 6

2. 28 factors 1,2,4,7,14,28 sum=56 i.e 2 * 28

can you tell any other perfect no?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

1 factors 1, 1 sum =2 i.e. 2*1

Edited by TimeSpaceLightForce
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Posted · Report post

1 factors 1, 1 sum =2 i.e. 2*1

1 has only 1 as a factor so sum is 1

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Didn`t find one yet

Edited by wolfgang
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Posted · Report post

Perfect numbers are number whose sum of factors are twice the number itself.

Example

1. 6 factors of 6 are 1,2,3 and 6 sum=12 i.e 2 * 6

2. 28 factors 1,2,4,7,14,28 sum=56 i.e 2 * 28

can you tell any other perfect no?

I would rather say they are half perfect because their factors sum is twice of them. 1 is perfect.

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Posted · Report post

I am only aware of this general rule.

P = 2

p-1(2p - 1), where M = 2p - 1 is a Mersenne prime.
Example:
2*(22 - 1) = 6
22*(23 - 1) = 28
24*(25 - 1) = 496
26*(27 - 1) = 8128
etc.

That is not to say there aren't any other possibilities for finding perfect numbers.

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Posted · Report post

COMBINATION: 4927

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Posted · Report post

Perfect numbers are number whose sum of factors are twice the number itself.

Example

1. 6 factors of 6 are 1,2,3 and 6 sum=12 i.e 2 * 6

2. 28 factors 1,2,4,7,14,28 sum=56 i.e 2 * 28

can you tell any other perfect no?

I would rather say they are half perfect because their factors sum is twice of them. 1 is perfect.

In old (Euclid) times, they did not count the number as its own divisor, but they did count 1. Thus, Perfect Number used to be equal to the sum of its divisors (Aliquot Parts.)

(Don't quote me on that.)

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