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The Letter Exchange I

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A word game with a logical aspect: each line represents a different word and each word has exactly N letters different than the word above and below it.

For this first installment, N=1 for the first group and N=2 for the second group. The first word of the second group has exactly 2 letters different than the last word of the first group.

Adding/subtracting a letter counts as 1 letter different, and there is no anagramming (yes, I like verbizing words ;P), although there may be in future editions.

Group 1:

Digital measure,

< bark,

Full of it when he's bitter,

Unit of distance,

Craft or sweep?

> matter,

Keep the pages together,

007,

Homeward _____,

= a pint.

Group 2:

diddiddiddiddid(___)diddiddiddiddid

No current when the circuit is this,

Cannot occupy the same orbital if the same,

Cowboy foot accessory,

Almost perfect bowl,

To such sweet sorrow,

Less than three,

Only do it to itself,

Middle (if you care about values),

Middle (if you care about number).

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Posted · Report post

Group 1:

Digital measure, bit

< bark,bite

Full of it when he's bitter, bile

Unit of distance, mile

Craft or sweep? mine

> matter,mind

Keep the pages together, bind

007,bond

Homeward _bound____,

= a pint.round

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Posted · Report post

Group 1:

Digital measure, bit

< bark,bite

Full of it when he's bitter, bile

Unit of distance, mile

Craft or sweep? mine

> matter,mind

Keep the pages together, bind

007,bond

Homeward _bound____,

= a pint.round

Good job on the appetizer. All right except one...you'll see when you start in on the main course ;). Meanwhile, I'm working on dessert...

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Posted · Report post

Cant quite make all the connections. yet...

_____,open,spin,spur,spare,part,pair,_____,mean,median

fun stuff, definitely think something sweet would be well received, too.

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Posted · Report post

Pun for 1st (in 10 did) and spat instead of spur. Other than that

:thumbsup:

I hope that "= pint" isn't "pound" because of your love of mathematical accuracy: http://en.wikipedia....int#Equivalence

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I think "less than three" is actually HEART --- <3

Edited by ColdTaco
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Posted · Report post

ooh, that's excellent ColdTaco. then maybe...

fear?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

The list is: Group 1- Bit, bite, bile, mile, mine, mind, bind, bond, bound, pound. Group 2- pun, open, spin, spur/spat, spare, part, heart, fear, mean, median.

Edited by ColdTaco
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Posted · Report post

Pun for 1st (in 10 did) and spat instead of spur. Other than that

:thumbsup:

I hope that "= pint" isn't "pound" because of your love of mathematical accuracy: http://en.wikipedia....int#Equivalence

My love isn't of mathematical accuracy in silly applied things such as the random ways countries decide to define units, it's of the elegance of theory and form. Math is the language of science, and the truly universal language ;P.

The list is: Group 1- Bit, bite, bile, mile, mine, mind, bind, bond, bound, pound. Group 2- pun, open, spin, spur/spat, spare, part, heart, fear, mean, median.

Yep, good job everyone. :thumbsup: Dessert will be served later this evening. Meanwhile, if you're still hungry, you could go wet your appetite on one of the unsolved riddles in my sig ;).

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Posted · Report post

My love isn't of mathematical accuracy in silly applied things such as the random ways countries decide to define units, it's of the elegance of theory and form. Math is the language of science, and the truly universal language ;P.

Not what I meant. I'm not interested in various countries interpretations of what a pint is either. But 1 pint doesn't equal 1 pound no matter where in the world you are. Unless 1.04etc is now within acceptable tolerance for "1". In which case, Pi = 3

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Not what I meant. I'm not interested in various countries interpretations of what a pint is either. But 1 pint doesn't equal 1 pound no matter where in the world you are. Unless 1.04etc is now within acceptable tolerance for "1". In which case, Pi = 3

I was going to let the whole thing go with just a facetious comment or two (cuz you know everything on wikipedia is 100% accurate @_@)...but now you've really poked the chemical engineering dragon :P

In theory, a fluid ounce is suppose to be defined as the volume of one ounce (weight) of water. So therefore, by definition, 1 pint = 1 pound = 16 ounces.

However, the thing about the volume of water, as is the volume of nearly all fluids, is that it is dependent on temperature and pressure, that is, 1 ounce by weight of water will have a different volume in, like, Denver, than in Florida, and in summer than in winter. So when they standardized the volume of a pint, they were measuring the volume of 16 ounces of water under a specific set of conditions, and in those conditions, 1 pint = 1 pound. Under different conditions, 1 pint can equal a decent range of weights and vice versa.

Without going into their sources, I don't know what conditions they measured the volume under to get the 1.04 they cited, but I and all the chemical engineers of the world guarantee you, under different conditions it will measure as 1.06, 1.02, 1.00, 0.98, etc. Basically, somewhere, under the exact right conditions, 1 US pint= 1.0000 pounds, but most places it will be off. But that is not the fault of the definition, i.e. of math, that is just a result of the practical need to standardize the volume they define as 1 US pint, and the fact that the pressure and temperature of areas in the world and the US is not constant.

Edit: Now I may just have to go unleash my scientifically fueled flames on wikipedia. I'm sure they'll be grateful XP.

Edited by Yoruichi-san
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Posted · Report post

I was going to let the whole thing go with just a facetious comment or two (cuz you know everything on wikipedia is 100% accurate @_@)...but now you've really poked the chemical engineering dragon :P

In theory, a fluid ounce is suppose to be defined as the volume of one ounce (weight) of water. So therefore, by definition, 1 pint = 1 pound = 16 ounces.

However, the thing about the volume of water, as is the volume of nearly all fluids (well, of all fluids and just about everything that contains molecules, but for most solids, and some semi-solid fluids, the change is negligible from a macroscopic stand point) , is that it is dependent on temperature and pressure, that is, 1 ounce by weight of water will have a different volume in, like, Denver, than in Florida, and in summer than in winter. So when they standardized the volume of a pint, they were measuring the volume of 16 ounces of water under a specific set of conditions, and in those conditions, 1 US pint = 1 pound. Under different conditions, 1 US pint can equal a decent range of weights and vice versa.

Without going into their sources, I don't know what conditions they measured the volume under to get the 1.04 they cited, but I and all the chemical engineers of the world guarantee you, under different conditions it will measure as 1.06, 1.02, 1.00, 0.98, etc. Basically, somewhere, under the exact right conditions, 1 US pint= 1.0000 pounds, but most places it will be off. But that is not the fault of the definition, i.e. of math, that is just a result of the practical need to standardize the volume they define as 1 US pint, and the fact that the pressure and temperature of areas in the world and the US is not constant.

Edit: Now I may just have to go unleash my scientifically fueled flames on wikipedia. I'm sure they'll be grateful XP.

Adding a few clarifications. Science is a rigorous mistress.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

And under any conditions of T and p, "a pint's a pound the world around"

is a saying that's spelled and spoken the same throughout the English-speaking

world. A case of artistic expression being more invariant than science. ^_^

Edit:

To admit the English-language usage restriction of an ostensibly global shibboleth.

Comment:

Even though it's imperfect science, its wide usage well qualifies it as a puzzle clue. :dry:

Edited by bonanova
Admission and comment
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Posted · Report post

OK.The problem here is that 16 US fl.oz weighs > 16 oz,due to:

"In 1824, the British abandoned both the Ale and the Wine gallons in favour of the Imperial gallon, based on the volume of 10 pounds of water (which works out at 277.41945 cu in).

America, by this time, had already standardised on the Wine Gallon of 231 cubic inches (strictly speaking, this was defined as the volume of a cylinder 6 inches long and 7 inches in diameter, or 230.9070 cubic inches)."

Gallons were divided into 8 pints

In US, 1 pint = 16 fl.oz...... 128 fl.oz/gallon

In UK, 1 pint = 20 fl.oz...... 160 fl.oz/gallon

As stated, 1 UK gallon weighs 10 lb

but

1 US gallon weighs 8.33 lbs.....(not the expected 8.0)

1 UK fl.oz = 1.73387195625 cu.in

1 US fl.oz = 1.8039609375 cu.in

1 ounce, fluid or liquid (U.S.) = 1.041 British fluid ounces

http://mathforum.org...view/52591.html

http://www.infopleas...a/A0001661.html

http://dictionary.re...de/weights.html

and an unusual source.....! http://www.bestfish.com/convert.html

There are many more.

As for the the saying. Yes I can accept there is artistic/poetic license at work, but it's not a saying that is used "all the world around" (for obvious reasons). Perhaps it's been corrupted over the years and the word "New" dropped... :P

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