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#41 andromeda

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 06:01 PM

Does not compute. You want to be "un-baptized" and still remain part of the church? O.o


Nooooo... ^_^ no part of anything, that's the whole point! I don't wanna be part of any religion and I am, even though I can say that I'm an agnostic, but still the baptism remains even if I don't believe in all that :rolleyes:
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#42 SomeGuy

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 06:13 PM

Pun intended? ;P



Haha, no. Sorry, careless usage of common phrases :(
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#43 octopuppy

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 06:17 PM

Nooooo... ^_^ no part of anything, that's the whole point! I don't wanna be part of any religion and I am, even though I can say that I'm an agnostic, but still the baptism remains even if I don't believe in all that :rolleyes:

Involuntary religious conversion... hmm, there's an idea for Uberfaith. If we said that you became a member of our religion if we waved a feather duster at you and said some magic words, would you believe it? If we did it would you feel obliged to consider yourself an Uberfaithist regardless of your personal opinions? I need to know.
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#44 Joe's Student

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 07:51 PM

Sorry about butting in, but for a long time on many threads I have read this debate on Religion in its many forms, it being an infinite back and forth that really achieves very little. One thing that has become clear though, is that there is a certain level of animosity towards those who 'believe' coming from the 'realists'. I can understand anyone feeling annoyance or anger towards people who force their religion upon others, feeling annoyance or anger that children are spoonfed a doctrine that they don't have much choice but to believe, and feeling annoyance or anger towards many of the inequalities some religions create.

I should say at this stage that I don't believe in any God of any kind and never have. But I have no problem with an individual believing what they believe. From personal experience I know a person's belief can be a great help through tough times. I grew up in a place that, before I was born, one side of the community was oppressed by the other, causing war, violence and everything it brings along with it. My family, and surrounding community, lived and suffered through alot of hardship etc. and I know alot of them relied subconciously on their religious beliefs. Especially the older generation, who having lived through a whole life of discrimination, felt that although they were condemned in their real life through default, they were able to take solace in the fact that there was 'a life', or a 'reward' even, in the form of the afterlife. I know my mother couldn't have carried on without that - however misguided - comfort.

So my point/question is this: Why do some of you who don't believe, here on BD, choose to become as bad as the preachers we all see and meet on the outside world, when coming on to a thread like this, and condemning those who do believe. Organised religion has many (too many) unacceptable downfalls, but it's hypocritical to deny someone their belief in a God if they don't indoctrinate or follow through with the inequalities (sub)conciously presented.

I hope this isn't taken out of context, as I agree as much as the next person that various religious teachings are wrong. But if someone believes in a God, and doesn't hate or discriminate against homosexuals [as an example] (I include many other things frowned upon by those teachings), then where's the problem? Let it be. Each to their own.

Edited by Joe's Student, 29 April 2009 - 07:54 PM.

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#45 palmerc7

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 07:56 PM

I hope this isn't taken out of context, as I agree as much as the next person that various religious teachings are wrong. But if someone believes in a God, and doesn't hate or discriminate against homosexuals [as an example] (I include many other things frowned upon by those teachings), then where's the problem? Let it be. Each to their own.


I completely agree with your whole statement, except for the end.

I agree, each to their own, let it be. It only becomes a serious issue when people are persecuted for no reason other than religion. For example, gay marriage. There is absolutely no reason against it other than religion. Come up with an economic or justifiable argument, I'll hear it out. I think religion has gained such a strangle hold on our government and society that the morally wrong teachings are affecting people's rights. I cite gay marriage only because it was the topic that set off some of the animosity, there are others.
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#46 Joe's Student

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 08:10 PM

I completely agree with your whole statement, except for the end.

I agree, each to their own, let it be. It only becomes a serious issue when people are persecuted for no reason other than religion. For example, gay marriage. There is absolutely no reason against it other than religion. Come up with an economic or justifiable argument, I'll hear it out. I think religion has gained such a strangle hold on our government and society that the morally wrong teachings are affecting people's rights. I cite gay marriage only because it was the topic that set off some of the animosity, there are others.

That's what I meant by "Don't take this out of context". I DO NOT AGREE WITH PERSECUTION BASED ON RELIGION OR RELIGIOUS BELIEFS :). Just to be clear. I don't see why you disagree with what I said? I'm clearly stating that I believe the type of discrimination outlined by you is wrong.

I hope this isn't taken out of context, as I agree as much as the next person that various religious teachings are wrong. But if someone believes in a God, and doesn't hate or discriminate against homosexuals [as an example] (I include many other things frowned upon by those teachings), then where's the problem? Let it be. Each to their own.


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#47 palmerc7

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 08:23 PM

We're arguing two different points.

No one here has said anything derogatory against those who believe. We are voicing against the fundamental inequalities.

Its an argument against those fundamentals, not the individuals. The teachings have ingrained themselves into society and government, that's where the line is.
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#48 Joe's Student

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 08:42 PM

We're arguing two different points.

No one here has said anything derogatory against those who believe. We are voicing against the fundamental inequalities.

Its an argument against those fundamentals, not the individuals. The teachings have ingrained themselves into society and government, that's where the line is.

I picked you up wrong, sorry. But I'm not for those 'fundamental inequalities' either, but it has appeared, IMO, a few times that individuals were ridiculed etc in a few of these threads. That's why I posted.
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#49 dath244

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 08:51 PM

I have a question for the Athiests. What would you do or think if the things in revelation started happening?
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#50 akaslickster

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 08:54 PM

Well my two cents is that most christians do have a great gift. They are usually friendly, honest, and morally decent in nature, while at peace with themselves. That does not apply to everyone, these days. Instead of people knocking religion of others, they need to have the maturity to respect differences and simply mind their own business.
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Posted ImageThe place where peace begins is within oneself. by Slick




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