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quitter...?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Ploper

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 11:35 PM

if you're a quitter who decides to quit your quitting ways.

What does that make you?
A quitter, because in quitting your quitting ways, you actually quitted.
Or a non-quitter, because you are no longer a quitter.
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#2 Linzd21

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 11:40 PM

if you quit your quitting ways that makes you a finisher
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#3 Ploper

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 12:08 AM

well, then couldn't quitting anything be called finishing?
if you're ending something you're finishing it, and if you're quitting something, you're ending it (at least for yourself)
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#4 Writersblock

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 01:05 AM

I'd propose that the definition of a "quitter" as used in standard English would be a person who easily or consistently quits on worthy persuits. Therefore, giving up being a quitter would not make him a quitter, as he is now engaged in a worthy persuit - changing a bad habit. A person engaged in a worthy persuit would be something quite different than a "quitter." B))
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#5 Ploper

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 01:19 AM

good point
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#6 bonanova

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 01:25 AM

if you're a quitter who decides to quit your quitting ways.

What does that make you?

Once accomplished, a former quitter.
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The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
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#7 Ploper

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 01:15 AM

what if you quit smoking though?
technically you're a quitter, but smoking is not a worthy pursuit at all.
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#8 Writersblock

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 01:41 AM

I still think you are misusing the term quitter as it's usually applied. You might use it in an ironic manner calling a new non-smoker a quitter, but I don't think that you would use it with it's normal negative connotation in reference to that person. The negative connotation is only applied where society (as a construct) would expect a person of value to not quit in that situation. For example, when the 49ers secondary quits against the seahawks' pass attack, as a staunch 49ers fan I yell at the TV "YOU *@%^ing QUITTERS!" If I ask my wife to quit nagging me and she does (yeah right) I don't then turn around and call her a quitter. (Wow, would that go over well!) :rolleyes:
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#9 Ploper

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 02:23 AM

ok ok ok.... I'm just gonna be pessimistic.

So, what if you're a person who constantly gets addicted to things (smoking, alcohol, biting your fingernails, etc.)
but then quits them soon after they get addicted.
you wouldn't call them a quitter, like you wouldn't call your wife a quitter.
but all of a sudden, he desides to one day quit quitting these things.
This is quiting a positive thing (you are quitting the act of quitting bad things)
In other words, quitting something that is positive like quitting negative addictions.
So wouldn't you be able to call this person a quitter? Just as you would yell "YOU *@%^ing QUITTERS" to the quitting 49ers?

I think I noticed where I went wrong in this post though...

W00t, 100th post :lol: :D :D
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#10 Linzd21

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 06:32 PM

I still say if you quit quitting it makes you a finisher. but it also makes you a starter. the real question here is that isn't quitting something old also starting something new. If I ever quit smoking im just going to say that i have started non-smoking.
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