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Coins


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83 replies to this topic

#11 apa

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 11:26 PM

I want the gold coin.

Who doesn't want a gold coin?
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#12 twittbrod

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Posted 10 July 2007 - 04:21 PM

Most of you are missing the point. If you simply say a true statement, you are guaranteed a coin, but not guaranteed a gold coin. Unless you get paid for each true statement (in which case you would simply say 3 true statements), simply telling the truth is not good enough.
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#13 Spec1alGift

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 06:09 PM

I Get It

but isnt it easier to say give me the gold coin or ill shoot ur head off????????????????? jk
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#14 bonanova

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 12:10 AM

"You will give me the gold coin." is close.

They can give you the gold coin [thus making the statement true and requiring them to do so.]
But they can also give you nothing [thus making the statement false and requiring them not to give you anything.] You have to add something to change the second outcome.

"You will give me the gold coin or you will give me nothing."

Now they can't give you nothing because that makes the statement true.
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The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell

#15 mathemagister

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 09:37 AM

Saying "You will not give the gold coin." creates a paradox!
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#16 Martini

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 05:59 AM

i would say "You're not going to give me all the coins." I'm not sure if that would work.


It wouldn't. You can be given the copper coin and you have told the truth.


yeah or just say "1+1=2"


And then you can still just get the copper coin.




Saying "You will not give the gold coin." creates a paradox!


No, it doesn't. The statement can be true: You get the copper or silver coin. Or the statement can be false: You get the gold coin.
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#17 Dillon

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 07:03 PM

To get a gold coin, you say "there are three coins on the table."

It's just about the most true statement.
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#18 Martini

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Posted 12 August 2007 - 11:47 PM

To get a gold coin, you say "there are three coins on the table."

It's just about the most true statement.


All that will do is guarantee that you get one of the coins, not necessarily a gold one- which is the goal of solving the problem.
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#19 Wordblind

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 09:11 PM

What stops the proctor from giving you a random coin from his pocket?

Better is:
"You will give me no coin, unless the gift includes both that golden coin and [Insert ruinous demand here.]"

He can't give you nothing, as the true statement would demand a coin.
He can't give coins without the golden one, as the false statement would require no coins
He can give you anything that includes the golden coin (plus ruinous demand).
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#20 Martini

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 10:20 PM

What stops the proctor from giving you a random coin from his pocket?


We are to assume that "If you say a truthful sentence, you will get one coin" means "If you say a truthful sentence, you will get one of the coins.
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