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Father and Son


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56 replies to this topic

#21 Freerefill

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 10:00 PM

I tried doing this riddle in months as opposed to years. The sum would be 792 months (66*12). I don't think there's a natural number which, when reversed and added to itself, equals 792. In fact, there must be a terrific few numbers which have that property, supposing we stick with natural numbers. The riddle further constrains by making one a factor of the other.

I was debating the "legality" of coming up with an answer in months and transforming that answer into years, where the years would be a non-natural number (id est, have a decimal point). I then questioned the validity of the debate, wondering if an answer in terms of 'years' was even required. I re-read the riddle, and it does say that the sum of the ages is 66. Note: not 66 years. So while my delving into months as an alternate way of answering this riddle proved fruitless, it could be that the beings with which this riddle is concerned are not human, and that 60 and 06 months, weeks, decades, picoseconds, and any other unit of time would work. Imagine having a son at 54 months (4.5 years) old.
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#22 IThinkImMe

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 12:13 AM

oops

Edited by IThinkImMe, 16 March 2008 - 12:15 AM.

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#23 Bob Coolio

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 12:22 PM

Couldn't it also be 15 aand 51 <_<
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#24 brhan

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 12:25 PM

Couldn't it also be 15 aand 51 <_<


Nope, because 15 is not a multiple of 51.
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#25 octopuppy

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 12:48 PM

How about there is one bloke who is both a father and a son. He's 66 (which is a multiple of 66 and adds up to 66)
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#26 brhan

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 12:57 PM

How about there is one bloke who is both a father and a son. He's 66 (which is a multiple of 66 and adds up to 66)

Nope, if he is 66 then his son should be 0 (In order to add-up to 66). Of course 0 is not a multiple of 66 :P
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#27 octopuppy

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 01:07 PM

Nope, if he is 66 then his son should be 0 (In order to add-up to 66). Of course 0 is not a multiple of 66 :P

One person. He is a father. He is a son. His age adds up to 66. The father's age (66) is a multiple of the son's age (also 66)
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#28 brhan

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 02:05 PM

One person. He is a father. He is a son. His age adds up to 66. The father's age (66) is a multiple of the son's age (also 66)

Ok, let me put it this way:
He is a father ==> age of father=66
He is a son ==> age of son=66
----------------------------------------
sum of ages of father and son = 132,

The puzzle was

The sum of the ages of a father and son is 66. The father's age is the son's age reversed. Furthermore, the father's age is a multiple of the son's age. How old could they be?


Hope you got the point now.
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#29 Mike H

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 07:34 PM

Ok, let me put it this way:
He is a father ==> age of father=66
He is a son ==> age of son=66
----------------------------------------
sum of ages of father and son = 132,

Hope you got the point now.


Then using the same person 33 would work.
33 + 33 = 66
33 * 1 = 33
33 reversed = 33

60 is not the reverse of 6, 6 is the reverse of 6. If the puzzle had stated "The son's age is the father's age reversed", then 6 and 60 would have worked. 60 reversed is 06, 06 = 6
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#30 enkhochir89

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 04:46 AM

[quote name='brhan' date='Sep 27 2007, 08:36 AM' post='5243']
The sum of the ages of a father and son is 66. The father's age is the son's age reversed. Furthermore, the father's age is a multiple of the son's age. How old could they be?

1. (xy)+(yx)=66
2. k*(xy)=66
3. x+y=6
{ 24+42=66
{ .====> the answer is the son is 24, the father is 42
{ (4*6)+(7*6)=66 or 24*11/4=66
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