Jump to content


Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum

Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum. Like most online communities you must register to post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process. To be a part of BrainDen Forums you may create a new account or sign in if you already have an account.
As a member you could start new topics, reply to others, subscribe to topics/forums to get automatic updates, get your own profile and make new friends.

Of course, you can also enjoy our collection of amazing optical illusions and cool math games.

If you like our site, you may support us by simply clicking Google "+1" or Facebook "Like" buttons at the top.
If you have a website, we would appreciate a little link to BrainDen.

Thanks and enjoy the Den :-)
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Father and Son


  • Please log in to reply
56 replies to this topic

#11 Benson

Benson

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts

Posted 28 September 2007 - 08:16 AM

Not unless you assume the question asks the ages in those units for which the multiples are integral -- minutes, seconds.
You obviously did not assume that -- years are the only units mentioned in your answer.


There's no need. You can still use Year to count in minutes, seconds or even to nano seconds. For example, 2.5 years.

Precision or looseness aside, it's nice to be consistent. B))


Yes, that's true. So, that "66" is pretty precision, therefore, we should precisely count their birth "time". :)
  • 0

#12 diamnds

diamnds

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 03:18 PM

Maybe 24 and 42 the father had his son when he was 18. :unsure:
  • 0

#13 Emapher

Emapher

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 03:55 PM

first response was 11-55 which would work except for the whole Father-AB and Son-BA - thing

So im going with 60-6!



Right?
  • 0

#14 brhan

brhan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 466 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 05:10 PM

Maybe 24 and 42 the father had his son when he was 18. :unsure:


Nope ... 24 is not multiple of 42. Try again ...
  • 0

#15 Morelessorother

Morelessorother

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 10 February 2008 - 10:16 PM

Hi there! This is my first post. Unfortunately I do not have the answer, but I would like to give some input.

06 and 60 isn't a bad idea, although personally I would not count it because I do not think that the age of 6 can really be called "zero six". Although in puzzles you never know!

Anyway, if it weren't for the pesky condition that the age of the father has to be a multiple of the age of the son then other answers would be:
Father 51 and son 15 or father 42 and son 24 (answer also given by diamnds).
Reversals are fine, sums are fine, but damn that multiple condition!

Having done way too much maths today due to this puzzle I would now deem it very likely that the answer must be given in the form of the number of months, not years. Am I correct or would it be too easy to tell?
Would anybody care to do the calculations using months as a new angle? (Using months as the next possible unit is far more likely than nano seconds...) I've been working at it for almost an hour now and the closest I got was the father being 591 months (49,25 years) old and the son being 195 months (16,25 years) old, together 65,5 years old (786 months).
  • 0

#16 dannchen

dannchen

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 19 February 2008 - 07:00 PM

The easiest way to look at this is to consider a number 'xy' where x is the tens digit and y the units digit. The number is therfore equal to 10x+y. In this example, you can see that since one number/age is the other one backwards, they add to give 10x+y+10y+x=11(x+y). So:

11(x+y)=66
(x+y)=6

Simple trial and error then means that if 'xy' is a multiple of 'yx' then the numbers must be 06 and 60 or 33 and 33. The latter is clearly not right for a father and son, so the father must be 60 and the son 06
  • 0

#17 ssxm

ssxm

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 19 February 2008 - 11:59 PM

33 and 33 is correct assuming the father is dead lol i r the win
  • 0

#18 bonanova

bonanova

    bonanova

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 20 February 2008 - 12:05 AM

33 and 33 is correct assuming the father is dead lol i r the win

What a morbid path to a cheap answer. :angry:
I love it!
  • 0
The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell

#19 unreality

unreality

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6370 posts

Posted 20 February 2008 - 12:17 AM

Yep I think that was what we first said

*edit* I checked, writersblock said 60 and 6, then me and cpotting said 33 and 33 :D cuz it said "father and son" it doesn't require that the father is the father of the son
  • 0

#20 roolstar

roolstar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 250 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 February 2008 - 10:12 AM

Having a son at 54??

Not sure if I would do that... Made me think about my life....


Anyhow, age seems to be always an approximation and never exact. You are 18 years old for 364 days!
And in all preceding similar puzzles, this was the assumption hidden in the OP.

So I'm not sure we should go into semesters or trimesters or months or days or weeks or hours or minutes or seconds or horoscope :)...
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users