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Castle


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#41 Taidaishar

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 09:48 PM

The calculation is correct and this solution would work, IF and only IF the bridge was really thin. But, unless the people are tightrope walkers, you would probably assume the bridge is maybe a half meter thick. If that is the case, then you would have to move the angled bridge (the first one) half a meter in towards the corner. Otherwise, you would not be able to secure both sides of the width on the land. And if you don't secure the two ends, then it won't support the the second bridge. Also, if both sides of the width aren't secured, then the bridge wont stay flat, and you wouldn't be able to walk on it anyway. Unless we are dealing with an army of tightrope walkers.



It wouldn't matter how thin the bridge is. The left edge will ALWAYS be 9.5m. If it were a thin bridge, it will STILL be 9.5m. Thus, it can span the same distance as the thin bridge with the right side also resting firmly on dry ground.
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#42 rookie1ja

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 10:11 PM


The calculation is correct and this solution would work, IF and only IF the bridge was really thin. But, unless the people are tightrope walkers, you would probably assume the bridge is maybe a half meter thick. If that is the case, then you would have to move the angled bridge (the first one) half a meter in towards the corner. Otherwise, you would not be able to secure both sides of the width on the land. And if you don't secure the two ends, then it won't support the the second bridge. Also, if both sides of the width aren't secured, then the bridge wont stay flat, and you wouldn't be able to walk on it anyway. Unless we are dealing with an army of tightrope walkers.



It wouldn't matter how thin the bridge is. The left edge will ALWAYS be 9.5m. If it were a thin bridge, it will STILL be 9.5m. Thus, it can span the same distance as the thin bridge with the right side also resting firmly on dry ground.


stability of bridge was questioned (and joelbernardo03 did some math on that) ... see picture below for better understanding

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#43 Taidaishar

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 10:43 PM

Yeah, all I was saying is that it doesn't matter about the width regardless of the math. I've demonstrated below. All the proportions are equal, so this should give you a good idea of what I'm talking about.

BridgeDemo.jpg[/attachment:7cb7b]

If the leading edge of both bridges is 9.5 meters, then both bridges can go the same amount of distance away from the corner as demonstrated above. Both bridges are the same length. The only different stat in the whole picture is the width of either bridge.

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#44 Jyrobritannica

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 09:35 PM

What if you put on board a full foot off the lege, then placed the second board on top of the first one that is sticking out a little, and thus make the gap to the castle. All you wold need is a few people standing on the board that is mostly on the ground (only has a foot peaking over the edge). Would that work?
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#45 joelbernardo03

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 09:39 PM

Yeah, all I was saying is that it doesn't matter about the width regardless of the math. I've demonstrated below. All the proportions are equal, so this should give you a good idea of what I'm talking about.

BridgeDemo.jpg[/attachment:82794]

If the leading edge of both bridges is 9.5 meters, then both bridges can go the same amount of distance away from the corner as demonstrated above. Both bridges are the same length. The only different stat in the whole picture is the width of either bridge.



absolutely correct, but assuming all the bridges they build are identical in width, you'd have a problem when you place the second bridge. in the picture below, you can see how the excess would be hanging over the edges and be very unsteady. the picture doesn't really do it justice. when you break down the numbers, the second bridge barely reaches the other side, only by a few inches. put a one meter wide bridge on a corner that is only 4 inches wide and you can imagine how wobbly it would be.

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#46 Dinghus

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 12:43 AM

Angle problems always baffle most people. Just put 1 across the corner and then another across from that 1 to the castle side.
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#47 ipyromaniac

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 02:44 PM

Doi; Just follow these instructions.
#You do not have extra support, so several people can fall back and hold the bridge down. Then everyone can cross one by one, then jump the remainder of the moat. When they are out of people (besides the bridgeholders) the bridgeholders cross 1 by 1, starting with the lightest, and ending with the heaviest making a run for it...
Not nearly as complicated as the admin's solution.
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#48 dethknite

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 07:49 PM

So I thought of overlaying them underwater for support... there is nothing on depth.. so one could assume to attempt this solution and it will be successful as long as the depth is < ~8.5 - 9 met ers... for cushion on the bottom...

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#49 biostrategem

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 02:56 PM

All of these answers are wrong. The right way to do it is to outfit the conquering nation's warriors in tangerine speedos and have them do flagrant calisthenics in the morning. The defending warrior's laughter will render them defenseless. Then, light some stuff and throw it at the castle. The defending castle will be vanquished and surrender out of general principle. After all, who would want to live in a freakin square castle with a morning view of men in tight outfits? Not me.
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#50 PlayTheMindGame

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 02:28 AM

I would just put 1 bridge across the corner and the other from the middle of that bridge the edge of the island. Like so:



That is a very good idea!
Clever. XD
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