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more weird words ...


Best Answer bonanova, 14 March 2013 - 04:17 PM

So, bonanova, isn't this thing solved yet?

You have got

1) senescence
2) strengths OR Stretched

3) queueing
4) angsts OR Witchcraft

5) Latchstring
6) facetiously

7) Indivisibility
8) bookkeeper

Well, but senescence is wrong answer, i can't find angsts in dictionary(there's only angst),and latchstring is actually latch-string

hmm.........

 

I think it's solved. Each of these were mentioned on one post or another:

  1. strengths
  2. strengths, stretched
  3. queueing
  4. [angsts] witchcraft lengths strengths
  5. latchstring [hyphen is optional]
  6. facetiously abstemiously
  7. indivisibility [indivisibilities if you want to show off - it has7 occurrences of i]
  8. bookkeeper
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53 replies to this topic

#21 kat

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 03:43 PM

i don't actually know the answer to any of them but i think that the people who do are like, really cool, even if i tried for like, twenty days, straight, i wouldn't be able to come up with a single one, even if i did use a dictionary, seriously, you guys are awesome, shame i'm not, he he :D
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#22 neida

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 11:39 AM

So far we have ...

[1] what is the longest English word that contains a single, unrepeated vowel? Strengths
[4] give 2 words that have 5 consecutive consonants. Strengths, Angsts, and yet a third: [clue: W _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ] might find it in MA
[5] give a word that has 6 consecutive consonants. [clue: L _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ] they went out of use 100 yrs ago


"Rhythmics" also meets all of the above, with the possible exception of 4, if 5 supercedes it.
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#23 bonanova

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Posted 10 April 2008 - 07:43 AM

"Rhythmics" also meets all of the above, with the possible exception of 4, if 5 supercedes it.

I think the rule for counting "y" as a vowel is that it makes the sound of a vowel, and it adds a syllable to the word.
rhyth·mics has two syllables, and the first syllable is formed by the sound of the y.
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#24 paboperfecto

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Posted 29 April 2008 - 12:29 AM

I think the rule for counting "y" as a vowel is that it makes the sound of a vowel, and it adds a syllable to the word.
rhyth·mics has two syllables, and the first syllable is formed by the sound of the y.


From AskOxford.com:

Yes, the letter Y is a vowel or a consonant! In terms of sound, a vowel is 'a speech sound which is produced by comparatively open configuration of the vocal tract, with vibration of the vocal cords but without audible friction...', while a consonant is 'a basic speech sound in which the breath is at least partly obstructed' (definitions from the New Oxford Dictionary of English, 1998). The letter Y can be used to represent different sounds in different words, and can therefore fit either definition. In myth or hymn it is clearly a vowel, and also in words such as my, where it stands for a diphthong (a combination of two vowel sounds). On the other hand, in a word like beyond there is an obstacle to the breath which can be heard between two vowels, and the same sound begins words like young and yes. (This consonant sound, like that of the letter W, is sometimes called a 'semivowel' because it is made in a similar way to a vowel, but functions in contrast to vowels when used in words.) Whether the letter Y is a vowel or a consonant is therefore rather an arbitrary decision. The letter is probably more often used as a vowel, but in this role is often interchangeable with the letter I. However, the consonant sound is not consistently represented in English spelling by any other letter, and perhaps for this reason Y tends traditionally to be counted among the consonants.
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#25 bonanova

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Posted 29 April 2008 - 03:16 AM

From AskOxford.com:

Yes, the letter Y is a vowel or a consonant!

In terms of sound, a vowel is 'a speech sound which is produced by comparatively open configuration of the vocal tract, with vibration of the vocal cords but without audible friction...', while a consonant is 'a basic speech sound in which the breath is at least partly obstructed' (definitions from the New Oxford Dictionary of English, 1998). The letter Y can be used to represent different sounds in different words, and can therefore fit either definition.

In myth or hymn it is clearly a vowel, and also in words such as my, where it stands for a diphthong (a combination of two vowel sounds). On the other hand, in a word like beyond there is an obstacle to the breath which can be heard between two vowels, and the same sound begins words like young and yes. (This consonant sound, like that of the letter W, is sometimes called a 'semivowel' because it is made in a similar way to a vowel, but functions in contrast to vowels when used in words.)

Whether the letter Y is a vowel or a consonant is therefore rather an arbitrary decision. The letter is probably more often used as a vowel, but in this role is often interchangeable with the letter I. However, the consonant sound is not consistently represented in English spelling by any other letter, and perhaps for this reason Y tends traditionally to be counted among the consonants.

Nice breakdown. B))

So ... in "rhythm" and related words,
the consonants "r" and "th" partly obstruct the breath; "h" is silent; and "y" is left to provide the vowel sound.
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#26 yomama1953

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 09:32 PM

I think he added Y because it's "the vowel that isn't", so to speak. It is often used in place of vowels, in words such as gypsy, tyne (the river) etc.

In my day, from which so much has changed, y and w were counted as vowels. They made us memorize all the adverbs too, lol. I am now a senior citizen and I still can quote them.
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#27 side pocket

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Posted 20 July 2008 - 03:15 AM

Nice breakdown. B))

So ... in "rhythm" and related words,
the consonants "r" and "th" partly obstruct the breath; "h" is silent; and "y" is left to provide the vowel sound.

When I went to grammer school (45 years ago!) We were taught that it was "A_E_I_O_U and sometimes Y and then other teachers would come along and make it "Sometimes Y an W! personally I have always thought You could make a weak case for "H" as well! :wacko:
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#28 Wlado

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 06:29 PM

When I went to grammer school (45 years ago!) We were taught that it was "A_E_I_O_U and sometimes Y and then other teachers would come along and make it "Sometimes Y an W! personally I have always thought You could make a weak case for "H" as well! :wacko:
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Well,I get that you went 45 years ago,because,it's spelled GRAMMAR. :)
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#29 Nikk29

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 11:12 PM

I got #3... Its sequoia... wait... CRAP... this is a tree, and it has every vowel (except y if thats included...) and its cool
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#30 Nikk29

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 11:14 PM

#7 - pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (9 o's, 6 i's) Yes, it is a word.

a lung disease caused by the intake of silicon from an erupted volcano
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