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14 replies to this topic

#1 sajow4

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 09:50 PM

This is neither a riddle nor a joke, but I simply wanted to know if others shared my opinion, or, if not, what their opinion was.

What is your definition of an arguement, or a dispute?
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#2 Riddari

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Posted 30 August 2007 - 01:22 AM

An argument can be one of several different things, depending on the context. If relation to this forum, I generally consider an argument a person's justification for their answer to a puzzle. However, an argument can also be a heated and often emotional discussion about a topic, as who should do the dishes after diner. Since a I also a programmer by profession, an argument can also be a parameter value passed to a program, procedure of function.

I generally consider a dispute to be similar to the second definition, but generally not as intense.
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#3 sajow4

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 07:56 AM

I believe that an arguement is an impolite disagreement between two or more people. A polite disagreement would the situation where two people disagree, but they accept the other's different point of view, and go on with whatever they were doing. In an impolite disagreement, or an "arguement", two people disagree, but keep sparring with words, to either prove themselves right or the other wrong.
I have asked my brother, but he said that this was more of the definition of "dispute". What do you think?
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#4 bonanova

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 04:03 PM

What is your definition of an arguement, or a dispute?

I assume you are asking for a distinction between the two.

To my mind an argument is making a case for a way of thinking, or to establish a point of view.
As attorneys argue cases in court.
In that sense an argument is much the same as a debate.
Debaters need not personally hold the positions they argue.
Nor need an attorney.
S/he is hired to speak in favor of a point of view

In a dispute there is a clash of two opposing held views.
Here the protagonists actually hold the views, and they may take action
up to and including crimes of violence or as nations sometimes do, wage war.

An argument can be theoretical [except when it involves my wife ] ;
a dispute is never just theoretical.
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The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
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#5 sajow4

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 08:48 PM

I know this may sound silly, but is this correct: That a dispute is, when broken down, an arguement, but only more fiercly?

In my mind, an arguement is an impolite disagreement, and a dispute is a fight, whether verbally or physically. Is this correct?
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#6 Martini

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 09:37 PM

I know this may sound silly, but is this correct: That a dispute is, when broken down, an arguement, but only more fiercly?


I think 'argument' and 'dispute' are pretty much synonymous, however, I think friendly arguments are more apt to be called arguments than disputes. Not a hard and fast rule of grammar, just something that I have found to be more common in every day usage.

Then there is the definition of argument that Riddari and bonanova mentioned which is synonymous with a reason that something is to be seen one way or another.

For instance, I can say, "I think that lizards make lousy pets and here is my argument: Lizards are too..."

When used that way, argument simply means a reason or reasons for believing something and there doesn't even have to be a person that disagrees with me or one that I'm arguing with.
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#7 unreality

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 11:48 PM

Arguement also has a meaning in programming, in C (or C++ which I am most familiar with) an arguement is a name for something passed to a function
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#8 sajow4

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 06:18 AM

I think 'argument' and 'dispute' are pretty much synonymous, however, I think friendly arguments are more apt to be called arguments than disputes.



If they are "friendly" than, as I have said before, it would not be considered an argument, if they simply were polite and continued on with whatever they were doing. If they started "arguing" than it would be an argument.

But yes, I believe that 'argument' and 'dispute' are synonyms, as you said.

For instance, I can say, "I think that lizards make lousy pets and here is my argument: Lizards are too..."

When used that way, argument simply means a reason or reasons for believing something and there doesn't even have to be a person that disagrees with me or one that I'm arguing with.



That is your opinion. If you were simply talking to yourself, it would not be an argument. An argument has to be with at least two people or more, else you are not arguing, and thus not an argument.
If you said: "I think that lizards make lousy pets because they are too boring", but someone else said "No, they are not, they are quite exciting" and both persons continued to argue, it would be an argument.
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#9 bonanova

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 02:05 PM

Here's how OneLook [onelook.com] summarizes argument.
It includes most of the views expressed.

Looking at these definitions, it might be justifiable to argue that a case could be made for concluding that a dispute is one type of argument, allowing for other types as well.

Quick definitions (argument)

noun: a variable in a logical or mathematical expression whose value determines the dependent variable;
if f(x)=y, x is the independent variable

noun: a summary of the subject or plot of a literary work or play or movie
(Example: "The editor added the argument to the poem")

noun: a fact or assertion offered as evidence that something is true
(Example: "It was a strong argument that his hypothesis was true")

noun: a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal
(Example: "The argument over foreign aid goes on and on")

noun: a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement
(Example: "They were involved in a violent argument")
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#10 Martini

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 06:48 PM

If they are "friendly" than, as I have said before, it would not be considered an argument, if they simply were polite and continued on with whatever they were doing. If they started "arguing" than it would be an argument.


That's not true. Go to the dictionary of your choice and look up 'argument' and you will see that there is nothing precluding an argument from being friendly.

From dictionary.com:

1. an oral disagreement; verbal opposition; contention; altercation: a violent argument.
2. a discussion involving differing points of view; debate: They were deeply involved in an argument about inflation.



Debating or discussing differing points of view can certainly be, and often are, friendly discussions.

That is your opinion. If you were simply talking to yourself, it would not be an argument. An argument has to be with at least two people or more, else you are not arguing, and thus not an argument.


It is not my opinion; I can back up my contention that that use of the word 'argument' does not necessitate two or more people with dictionary definitions and I can state it is a fact.

Further entries from dictionary.com:

3. a process of reasoning; series of reasons: I couldn't follow his argument.
4. a statement, reason, or fact for or against a point: This is a strong argument in favor of her theory.
5. an address or composition intended to convince or persuade; persuasive discourse.
6. subject matter; theme: The central argument of his paper was presented clearly.


BTW, were both arguing our points, but I certainly consider it friendly.
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