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Atheism discussion


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240 replies to this topic

#231 RainThinker

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 01:41 AM

All religions are actually forms of Atheism, an example: Christians are atheists to the Norse god's and the Egyptian gods, Regular Atheists have taken it one god further, not believing in God.
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#232 sudheeran

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 09:18 AM

Hehe, I've wondered that myself. I mean, why does pi = 3.141592653589793238462643383279502884... and e = 2.7182818284...? Why not 5.3896476625092854657... or 278.5? They just seem so random, and yet they work out so perfectly in certain situations.

As from what I know, pi is simply the perimeter of a circle divided by its diameter. How can it be different from the value 3.14.....
Like the perimeter of a square divided by the diameter of an inscribing circle is 4.00. Diameter of the inscribing circle is the length of one side of the square. So the ratio has to be 4.00. How can it be different ? Similarly pi has to be 3.14... Do I sound naive? If so please excuse me. Other wise comments please.
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#233 Frost

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 08:11 PM

As from what I know, pi is simply the perimeter of a circle divided by its diameter. How can it be different from the value 3.14.....
Like the perimeter of a square divided by the diameter of an inscribing circle is 4.00. Diameter of the inscribing circle is the length of one side of the square. So the ratio has to be 4.00. How can it be different ? Similarly pi has to be 3.14... Do I sound naive? If so please excuse me. Other wise comments please.


Everyone knows that, it's just why? I know what pi is, but I was merely speculating on the fact that things could theoretically be different, like different physical properties or laws of motion or one of various other things. I'm not saying that it is ever different, just wondering if it's at all possible. Of course pi is pi, but imagine if it wasn't.
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#234 unreality

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 09:19 PM

then we would be wondering why it was whatever it was instead :P lol

Pi is different, if you use a different numerical base or counting system or mathematical system (not sure if it changes in non-euclidean geometry) ;D

I think I linked something earlier why pi is close to 3
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#235 Frost

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 05:11 AM

Pi is different, if you use a different numerical base or counting system or mathematical system (not sure if it changes in non-euclidean geometry) ;D


It still represents the same value, so no, it's not different in numerical sense, only it how it is written.
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#236 octopuppy

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 02:59 PM

It still represents the same value, so no, it's not different in numerical sense, only it how it is written.

I think it's pretty much determined by how we define distance, so in another geometrical system it could be a different value.
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#237 unreality

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 10:30 PM

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:lol: :lol:


Something I do think about is why pi & e are so small. It seems that all the cool, important numbers are very small. From the important square roots to the two golden ratios (although those are explained, they have to be (1ñ5)/2 because of the quadratic equation), to the transcendental numbers like pi and e. They're all relatively small on our number line. It's not like pi is 17012687432371112223448784425435435787898966634221357487723243.07707709806232112
4812

you know? B))
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#238 octopuppy

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 12:16 AM

:lol: :lol:


Something I do think about is why pi & e are so small. It seems that all the cool, important numbers are very small. From the important square roots to the two golden ratios (although those are explained, they have to be (1ñ5)/2 because of the quadratic equation), to the transcendental numbers like pi and e. They're all relatively small on our number line. It's not like pi is 17012687432371112223448784425435435787898966634221357487723243.07707709806232112
4812

you know? B))

Oh I don't know, I think any number bigger than 0.00001 is really big. You know how many numbers there are smaller than that?
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#239 unreality

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 12:59 AM

I knew you would say that, tis why I said relatively small :P I also know that you know what I mean ;D hehe. But if 'small' isn't acceptable, then the question can be rephrased as: why are pi and e so close to each other [relative to most numbers that we deal with on our number line]?
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#240 octopuppy

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 05:48 PM

I knew you would say that, tis why I said relatively small :P I also know that you know what I mean ;D hehe. But if 'small' isn't acceptable, then the question can be rephrased as: why are pi and e so close to each other [relative to most numbers that we deal with on our number line]?

Sorry, I was being facetious there. It is an interesting question really. A lot of such numbers are geometrical ratios and I suppose the nature of geometry means that interesting geometrical ratios tend not to be too far from 1 (because two related distances are probably going to be on roughly the same scale). Maybe some similar logic applies to other numbers like gamma (0.577...) and e (2.718...). If you take a random infinite series (whatever that is) I suspect that it is most likely to converge quite close to 1 or not at all. I must admit I'm a little unsatisfied by my own answer there. All the mathematical constants I can think of are within the 1/5 to 5 bracket. It is a very small bracket, you'd think one or two might have made it into the realms of 1/100 to 100, say.
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