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What is Correct


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79 replies to this topic

#51 mindwarp

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 05:04 PM

The 'or' implies that at least one is correct. As only once change has occurred we must assume that the correctness refers to the change.


OR does not imply that at least one is correct. It implies such only if the statement is true. That is, only one statement in an OR clause need to be true for the entire statement to be true (although not all statements need be true, only one of them). Thus, if the answer is "No", then all statements are false. Whereas an AND clause requires all statements to be true to be true, otherwise the entire clause is false if a single statement is false.

On the other hand I'm putting my foot down that the grammatical correctness, despite the presence of the word "sum"-- which may only be a typo, is "seven and five IS thirteen (in base 13)".

Look at these examples. Never do they ask, "What are the sum of x + y?" It's always in the format, "What IS the sum of...". Thus a little reverse engineering would enlighten our tiny brains to the truth that math uses "IS" as an equality and not "ARE".

Good day!
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#52 Lost in space

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 12:51 PM

OR does not imply that at least one is correct. It implies such only if the statement is true. That is, only one statement in an OR clause need to be true for the entire statement to be true (although not all statements need be true, only one of them). Thus, if the answer is "No", then all statements are false. Whereas an AND clause requires all statements to be true to be true, otherwise the entire clause is false if a single statement is false.

On the other hand I'm putting my foot down that the grammatical correctness, despite the presence of the word "sum"-- which may only be a typo, is "seven and five IS thirteen (in base 13)".

Look at these examples. Never do they ask, "What are the sum of x + y?" It's always in the format, "What IS the sum of...". Thus a little reverse engineering would enlighten our tiny brains to the truth that math uses "IS" as an equality and not "ARE".

Good day!

You are are happy with what instead of which then!
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#53 RiddleRookie

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 02:44 PM

Neither - their twelve
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#54 geronimo_b

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 08:12 PM

That's just silly, seven and five is twelve.
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#55 dbriti

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 04:35 PM

The answer is "is". This is a grammar question not a math one. It is true that 7+5 is 12 and not 13, but that is irrelivant.
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#56 katie07-08

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 07:28 PM

7 and 5 make 12 not 13
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#57 IamAl

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 10:53 AM

u nearly got me with that one
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#58 Steve Luke

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 03:20 PM

The answer is "is". This is a grammar question not a math one. It is true that 7+5 is 12 and not 13, but that is irrelivant.


Where does it say the question is about grammar?

If you were asked: "Is it correct that seven and five is thirteen?" would you answer yes or no? Probably no since 7 and 5 is 12.
If you were asked: "Is it correct that seven and five are thirteen?" would you answer yes or no? Probably no, either because of the math or grammar.
So, since both statements independently are false when they are combined with an OR: "Is it correct that seven and five is thirteen or seven and five are thirteen?" the entire statement is also false so the answer must be No.

What confused me a bit is the title, "Which is correct". Which does imply one of multiple options is correct (and perhaps more than one). But the actual statement says "Is it correct" so it isn't a choice in finding one that is proper, but in determining if the entire statement is correct.

edit: And now re-reading it I see the title is actually 'What is Correct' not 'Which is Correct'. I don't know how 'What' would be applied here, sounds more philosophical than grammar or math ;)

Edited by Steve Luke, 25 April 2008 - 03:29 PM.

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#59 Vishmi

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 04:44 PM

Well the question is asked in a grammatical way, so I would say the correct grammar is "Seven and five are thirteen".
If you take it as a mathematical equation then as far as I know AND operand means plus (sum), therefore answer should be "Seven and five are twelve (7+5 = 12)"
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#60 thesegamesarecool

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 05:33 PM

omg none of them are correct 7+5=12 not 13 so none of them are correct
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