Jump to content


Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum

Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum. Like most online communities you must register to post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process. To be a part of BrainDen Forums you may create a new account or sign in if you already have an account.
As a member you could start new topics, reply to others, subscribe to topics/forums to get automatic updates, get your own profile and make new friends.

Of course, you can also enjoy our collection of amazing optical illusions and cool math games.

If you like our site, you may support us by simply clicking Google "+1" or Facebook "Like" buttons at the top.
If you have a website, we would appreciate a little link to BrainDen.

Thanks and enjoy the Den :-)
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Trains


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
59 replies to this topic

#11 larryhl

larryhl

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts

Posted 13 June 2007 - 01:36 PM

Veracity, you're a little off. The answer to the brain teaser is that the train to New York is closer to New York when it meets the train from Boston. Why? Because things in this world have mass, they aren't points. If everything was points, then yeah, they'd be the same distance from New York when they meet. But think about it, trains are LONG (usually). So that means while the engines of both trains have met, you still have all those cars behind the engine to account for. So obviously, the train coming from New York is still closer to New York.
  • 0

#12 Veracity

Veracity

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts

Posted 14 June 2007 - 02:14 PM

Veracity, you're a little off. The answer to the brain teaser is that the train to New York is closer to New York when it meets the train from Boston. Why? Because things in this world have mass, they aren't points. If everything was points, then yeah, they'd be the same distance from New York when they meet. But think about it, trains are LONG (usually). So that means while the engines of both trains have met, you still have all those cars behind the engine to account for. So obviously, the train coming from New York is still closer to New York.




YEP!! Makes sense...LOL
  • 0

#13 Tammer

Tammer

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 06:42 AM

You know...you really don't have to be so rude about it. I don't know any of you people here. But I think it's something to try to figure out the answers to these logic questions without someone name calling. Why can't you explain things without being so rude?
  • 0

#14 Veracity

Veracity

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:05 PM

You know...you really don't have to be so rude about it. I don't know any of you people here. But I think it's something to try to figure out the answers to these logic questions without someone name calling. Why can't you explain things without being so rude?



I'm not really sure who you are talking about, but if it was me, and I upset you, then I am VERY SORRY!!!.....


Wait,,,,,,

Hold on, I think I,,,,, ()




Ahhhh, There it is......

THE ONLY PERSON BEING RUDE, IS YOU!!! WE ARE JOKING AROUND WITH EACHOTHER WITH ABSOLUTELY NO EMOTION BEHIND ANYTHING WE ARE SAYING. YOU ARE RIGHT, YOU "DO NOT" KNOW ANY OF US YET ARE JUDGING OUR ACTIONS AS IF YOU DO.


We come here everyday and have fun with the Logic puzzles, however it would be quite a boring place without a little Sense of Humor. This is a prime example... You can either read my response and get upset, or TAKE IT WITH A GRAIN OF SALT and tell me TO ATTEND A FEW ANGER MANAGMENT CLASSES...lol..(( I would much rather the Sarcastic "Anger Management comeback myself _))

Are you one of us?

-Veracity-
  • 0

#15 KCshushu

KCshushu

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 20 June 2007 - 02:51 PM

Woah...that one almost had me >_< As a side note: Someone should warn those trains, they're both headed toward a serious collision
  • 0

#16 Incognitum

Incognitum

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 22 June 2007 - 01:24 PM

Yup, I had the same thought: for point particles this answer works, but for trains with length the one leaving new york is closer unless you define 'encounter' very carefully.
  • 0

#17 lukegaru

lukegaru

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts

Posted 03 July 2007 - 08:19 PM

neither.when they encounter each other they are in the same place.
  • 0

#18 ayam

ayam

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 25 July 2007 - 03:50 AM

I think the answer is so:

the distance from boston and new york isn't important here. Consider that the distance is "x" and consider that both trains are points (because of physics' theory). Using the linear uniform movement equation, you get the following expression:

t1 = x / v (train that leaves new york)
t2 = x / 2v (train that leaves boston)

t1 = time to smack into eachother
t2 = time to smack into eachother
x = distance from new york to boston

As you can see, the faster is the speed the lesser wil be the time to encounter a point that the two trains will smack into eachother. So, if you take a half of time to get the other side of city, probably the two trains will be in the same distance from new york when they encounter eachother.
  • 0

#19 Zinkyu

Zinkyu

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 18 August 2007 - 02:08 AM

This, of course, assumes that there is only one track between New York and Boston. If there were only one track, then yeah I could see the trains smacking into each other.

But yeah, I think I see the point. It's a trick question.

Which train will be closer to New York when they encounter?

When the trains encounter each other, they are technically both the same distance away from Pt. A (because they are on the same point on the line between Pt. A and Pt. B.).


[Boston]----------------------------------[wherever the trains have met eachother]---------[New York]

So no matter how fast one train is going versus the other, the distance between the encounter point and New York are the same for both trains (unless you're counting the fact that the train leaving New York has a caboose that's closer to New York than the train leaving Boston).

Does that settle the dispute?
  • 0

#20 pocho

pocho

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 18 August 2007 - 05:55 PM

Well, if the first train takes 5 minutes to get to Boston, they are going to meet in Boston before the other starts going to NY. It totaslly depends on the speed and it is a variable we have to know in order to know the answer.
Otherwise, there are many answers for this question.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users