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Pole in lake


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115 replies to this topic

#71 PepsiGal247

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 09:06 AM

There is a pole in a lake. One half of the pole is in the ground, another one third is covered by water and eight feet is out of the water. What is the total length of the pole in feet?



Spoiler for Just a guess from me on how to solve it.:

1/3+1/2=8
1/3=2/6
1/2=3/6
2/6+3/6=5/6=8

so I think the answer will
be whatever 1/3 of 8 is
plus 8

I got 32.242424242424242424242424242424

Anyhow that's what I got but that was just a guess from what I remember but I do remember you having to change the bottom numbers to work with fractions that were different like the 1/2 and 1/3 by finding a closest number that they both went into.

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#72 VDTB

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 10:14 AM

Definitely a 48 ft pole.

With the length of the pole as "P" then... P divided by 2 for the portion in the ground + P divided by 3 for the portion in the water + 8 for the final bit out of the water. This then looks something like P = P/2 + P/3 + 8 then solve the equation, you get 48.
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#73 ktglo4him

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 08:39 PM

I believe that the pole is only 12 feet long.


HELLO...
1/2 is under the ground, which LEAVES 1/2 of the pole.
1/3 is under the water but above the ground. This means that 2/3 of the remaining half is taken away.
This leaves 1/3 of that half.
1/3 of one half is 1/6. This is the portion of the pole that is both above ground AND above water.

If 1/6 of the pole is 8 feet long, so the whole pole must be 48 feet long.
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#74 Dr.Hobo

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 09:38 PM

Spoiler for Answer

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#75 Lost in space

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 11:10 PM

Are people allowing for the inverse universe trapezoid destabilisation of axis of N,S (North/South pole). There are some sub aquations to be considered for the water and root canal work at the spring equinox according to the Gregorian calendar. Further, the ground is subject to tremor and hippy hippy shake siZeMick activity and given that a piece of wood may change it's volume by 6.8% growth in water and 7.7% shrinkage in natural regular drying conditions not to mention the decay that has taken place since the original OP.
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#76 Sky

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 12:57 AM

Are people allowing for the inverse universe trapezoid destabilisation of axis of N,S (North/South pole). There are some sub aquations to be considered for the water and root canal work at the spring equinox according to the Gregorian calendar. Further, the ground is subject to tremor and hippy hippy shake siZeMick activity and given that a piece of wood may change it's volume by 6.8% growth in water and 7.7% shrinkage in natural regular drying conditions not to mention the decay that has taken place since the original OP.


This is very true, originally I had found something similar to this, but unfortunately I only speak in Mosaic when i talk about problems like this, so I used a handy transizzlator I found on the web to help me out:

You miznust not forget tizzy tha pole is also mizzle of a composite wood tizzy wizzle wet experiences expansion different thiznen what would be seen in a normal piece of dowel or maple. This can be accounted fo` in tha equation: z0mg * 48 f337 10Ng = 48 . Keep'n it gangsta dogg. Simple algebra will prove T-H-to-tha-izzat this, n only this is tha right answa . Snoop dogg is in this howse. Everyone else needs ta show respect n understand this. Out.

Edit: If mah gurrl PepsiGal247 uses that big of font in the I-to-the-interizznet, she must yell all the time in the real lyfe fo shizzle.

Edited by Sky, 04 June 2008 - 01:00 AM.

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#77 Trevor214

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 04:14 AM

use fractions....

lets use 6ths of fractions
3/6 is underground, 2/6 is in water
3/6 + 2/6 = 5/6
if 1/6 = 8ft.... then 8*6 will equal the total length

the length is 48ft.

simply done
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#78 woon

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 05:55 AM

Spoiler for My answer

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#79 brilliant

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 06:50 PM

Where does it say that the 8 ft is above the water? I believe the 8 ft is the length of the underground pole(which is out of the water). hence 8+ 8= 16ft. The third that is covered by water is unnecessary info. :P
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#80 Abby Normal

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 12:38 PM

There is a pole in a lake. One half of the pole is in the ground, another one third is covered by water and eight feet is out of the water. What is the total length of the pole in feet?

I too came up with 12 feet.
1/3 is in the water and 8 feet is out of the water.
8 feet = 2/3
1/2 of that is 4 feet
So each 1/3 is 4 feet
4x3=12 feet
It doesn't matter how much is in the ground as long as you know how much is in and out of the water.

Edited by Abby Normal, 09 June 2008 - 12:39 PM.

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