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#11 bonanova

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 10:20 PM

On the right track ... but from the OP you should be able to conclude
that you start the interval from a moment of a single chime. When
does the interval end, that will make the longest time you'd have to
wait until you're sure what time it is? Think about the time the interval
starts and how long you might wait until you're sure what time it is.

That's just a restatement of the OP, but it should show that some
guesses are going to be wrong, so I hope that's a help. :rolleyes:
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#12 largeneal

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 10:41 PM

Ok, I'm going to be stubborn and remain confident of my answer UNLESS some other time exists that applies to this one (but I have 99% ruled that out). I don't see how it can be anything LESS than my original answer, because if it were, then that force a possibly incorrect assumption on the starting time. Maximum consecutive single chimes is 7. I don't know how it could be any LONGER than my original answer unless you're pulling some daylight savings trick here :P
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#13 EventHorizon

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 10:44 PM

A clock chimes the hour, every hour on the hour, and once each quarter hour in between.
If you hear it chime once, what is the longest you may have to wait to be sure what time it is?


Spoiler for my guess


Way off? Or did I get it?
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#14 Lost in space

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 10:57 PM

On the right track ... but from the OP you should be able to conclude
that you start the interval from a moment of a single chime. When
does the interval end, that will make the longest time you'd have to
wait until you're sure what time it is? Think about the time the interval
starts and how long you might wait until you're sure what time it is.

That's just a restatement of the OP, but it should show that some
guesses are going to be wrong, so I hope that's a help. :rolleyes:

single chime is 12:15 - 12:30 is the interval so thats 15mins, unless it's 00:15 then I might drop off and not be certain unless i hear the second chime of 2am, but if the wife is down stairs changing the DST at the first chime (bless her) then it could be one more hour, Da6m it's 23:5 here. Hope I do not listen to the bells Esmerelda (that name rings a bell)
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#15 EventHorizon

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 10:58 PM

...I don't know how it could be any LONGER than my original answer unless you're pulling some daylight savings trick here :P

Spoiler for other answers?

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#16 bonanova

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 04:48 AM

Wow. It's not that hard. Really.

OK let's get the clutter out of the way.
[1] forget DST - say it's the middle of June.
[2] If you hear, say, the last chime of 12:00, you heard all 12 chimes.
Hmmm... I guess that's it.

Here's a hint.
One of EventHorizon's time intervals is correct, but the reason given
[start and end points] is not.

OK so now the answer should include the interval and the end points.

Final hint. No seconds are involved.
For the purpose of calculating intervals, you may assume every chime [however many
individual sounds it has] happens instantaneously on precisely :00, :15, :30, or :45.

There it is, on a platter. :huh:
Take it. B))
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#17 Nikyma

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 05:08 AM

Spoiler for Where's my fork?

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#18 Duh Puck

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 05:08 AM

Spoiler for NON-solution


*Edit: Oops. My bad. I somehow left 1:45 out as a possibility at 1:15, which means 1:30 could be 1:30 or 1:45, and you'd have to wait the full 90 minutes, as largeneal said. Ok, now I'm perplexed.

Edited by Duh Puck, 04 April 2008 - 05:13 AM.

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#19 largeneal

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 05:18 AM

where is 1:45, though?
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#20 giterdone

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 05:28 AM

Spoiler for a better guess

Spoiler for check and mate

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