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12 replies to this topic

#11 ash013

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 11:15 AM

Spoiler for answer

I want to find out how good your vocabularies are, so...

Here are 2 words for you to research:

1. the longest word in the english language

and

2. the fear of long words

Spoiler for Hint for 1


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#12 Lost in space

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 11:41 AM

Nice one!
Lopadotemakhoselakhogameokranioleipsanodrimypotrimmatosilphiokarabomelitokatakek
hymenokikhlepikossyphophattoperisterphobiaticleri- alektryonoptokephalliokigklopeleiolagōiosiraiobaphētraganopterýgōn

Don't like the rotten dog fish - I'll leave that bit out!
Forgot about the pepsi and macD ones, I can still recite them but it has no use and impresses only me - sad old me!
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#13 andreay

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 02:28 PM

It's the former.

Titin, also known as connectin, is a protein that is
important in the contraction of striated muscle tissues.

As the largest known protein,
titin also has the longest IUPAC name.
The full chemical name, containing 189,819 letters,
is sometimes stated to be the longest word in the English language.

However, some professional dictionary writers regard generic names
of chemical compounds as verbal formulae rather than as English words


my thoughts exactly bona which is why i wanted to confirm in the dictionary or the general language. If you can actually find the word somewhere online apparently it takes 48 pages of size 12 writing on word
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