Jump to content


Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum

Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum. Like most online communities you must register to post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process. To be a part of BrainDen Forums you may create a new account or sign in if you already have an account.
As a member you could start new topics, reply to others, subscribe to topics/forums to get automatic updates, get your own profile and make new friends.

Of course, you can also enjoy our collection of amazing optical illusions and cool math games.

If you like our site, you may support us by simply clicking Google "+1" or Facebook "Like" buttons at the top.
If you have a website, we would appreciate a little link to BrainDen.

Thanks and enjoy the Den :-)
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Ken Ken


Best Answer kukupai, 14 September 2013 - 03:04 PM

Spoiler for about 45 minutes

Go to the full post


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 bonanova

bonanova

    bonanova

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5565 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 11 September 2013 - 06:44 PM

I've gotten hooked on Ken Ken. It's like Sudoku with extra constraints.

Numbers 1-9 must occur in every row and column.

Clusters of numbers must also obey rules.

 

Within a cluster,

  • 15+ means they must sum to 15. e.g. 6 and 9.
  • 5- means the (two) numbers must differ by 5. e.g. 3 and 8.
  • 72x means their product must be 72, e.g. 2 4 9.
  • 4/ means the (two) numbers must have 4 as a quotient. e.g. 2 and 8.

Clusters for + and x can have any number of members.

For - and / there obviously can be only two members in a cluster.

 

I find the "expert" 9x9 puzzles can provide 30-60 minutes of fun.

Here's one for you:

 

9e47.jpg

 


  • 0
The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell

#2 Anza Power

Anza Power

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 80 posts

Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:48 PM

There is lots of these and others on http://www.conceptispuzzles.com/ (Ken Ken is called CalcuDoku there)
  • 0

#3 Barcallica

Barcallica

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Posted 12 September 2013 - 11:13 AM

Please clarify right bottom corner


  • 0

#4 bonanova

bonanova

    bonanova

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5565 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 12 September 2013 - 10:25 PM

Please clarify right bottom corner


Three numbers that add to 15.
  • 0
The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell

#5 phil1882

phil1882

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 507 posts

Posted 13 September 2013 - 01:49 PM

Spoiler for huh??!!

 


  • 0

#6 jhawk

jhawk

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 32 posts

Posted 13 September 2013 - 05:01 PM

Spoiler for Another Logical Contradiction?


  • 0

#7 jhawk

jhawk

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 32 posts

Posted 13 September 2013 - 09:24 PM

Spoiler for huh??!!
84 also is 2x6x7

 


  • 0

#8 bonanova

bonanova

    bonanova

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5565 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 14 September 2013 - 11:16 AM

Spoiler for huh??!!

 

 

In your diagram, I would insert 6 above 2. Cells (5,5) and (5,6) respectively.


  • 0
The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell

#9 bonanova

bonanova

    bonanova

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5565 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 14 September 2013 - 11:23 AM

Spoiler for Another Logical Contradiction?

 

What you have found is that the 5's in columns 7 and 8 go, one each, in the 3- and the 280x clusters.

Possibly in cells (7,1) and (8,5). If not, then in cells (8,1) and (7,4) or (7,5).

 

And you have found that the  7's in columns 5 and 6 go, one each, in the 21x and the 84x clusters.

Possibly in cells (6,1) and (5,7). If not, then in cells (5,1) and (6,6) or (6,7).

 

You're making progress.


  • 0
The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell

#10 jhawk

jhawk

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 32 posts

Posted 14 September 2013 - 11:55 AM

. I had a brain fart there and gave up ! Now I will go back and try to continue


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users