Jump to content


Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum

Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum. Like most online communities you must register to post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process. To be a part of BrainDen Forums you may create a new account or sign in if you already have an account.
As a member you could start new topics, reply to others, subscribe to topics/forums to get automatic updates, get your own profile and make new friends.

Of course, you can also enjoy our collection of amazing optical illusions and cool math games.

If you like our site, you may support us by simply clicking Google "+1" or Facebook "Like" buttons at the top.
If you have a website, we would appreciate a little link to BrainDen.

Thanks and enjoy the Den :-)
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 skip2k

skip2k

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 19 March 2008 - 10:55 PM

It is widely recognized that there are three versions of the word (to, too, two) in the English dictionary. If you had to make up a sentance stating that there are three 2s in the Enlish Language, how would you spell the word for 2s? Perhaps there's a fourth to describe the other three???

If I knew the answer, I'd be happy to provide the spoiler, but I don't.
  • 0

#2 octopuppy

octopuppy

    Senior Member

  • VIP
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1303 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 March 2008 - 09:49 PM

It is widely recognized that there are three versions of the word (to, too, two) in the English dictionary. If you had to make up a sentance stating that there are three 2s in the Enlish Language, how would you spell the word for 2s? Perhaps there's a fourth to describe the other three???

If I knew the answer, I'd be happy to provide the spoiler, but I don't.



There are four fours too (four for fore fawe). If there was a fourth too for the other three there'd be a fifth four too for sure.
  • 0

#3 jword

jword

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 120 posts

Posted 20 March 2008 - 10:26 PM

I know somebody who works a two minutes to two, to two minutes to two, shift. Do you work two to two,to two to two,too? :P
  • 0

#4 statman

statman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 124 posts

Posted 20 March 2008 - 11:25 PM

It is widely recognized that there are three versions of the word (to, too, two) in the English dictionary. If you had to make up a sentance stating that there are three 2s in the Enlish Language, how would you spell the word for 2s? Perhaps there's a fourth to describe the other three???

If I knew the answer, I'd be happy to provide the spoiler, but I don't.

Interesting question. I don't know if there would be a generally accepted answer. Myself, I would use the International Phonetic Alphabet; I think it would be something like: There are three [tw]s in the English language. Of course, I am probably using the wrong vowel sound, and the correct one may not be available in this font.
  • 0

#5 Lost in space

Lost in space

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4009 posts

Posted 20 March 2008 - 11:36 PM

i know someone who new one and he new one too
Old n gold

Tew, to, too, two

fawe, for, fore, four - u need one more now octopuppy (FAW is fire at wil - still alive aparrently and acronyms don't count)
  • 0

#6 bonanova

bonanova

    bonanova

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 23 March 2008 - 08:33 AM

It is widely recognized that there are three versions of the word (to, too, two) in the English dictionary. If you had to make up a sentance stating that there are three 2s in the Enlish Language, how would you spell the word for 2s? Perhaps there's a fourth to describe the other three???

The problem with the question is in the assumption.
There are not three versions of a single word.
There are three words which sound alike.

If two and too are the same word, just different versions, and we say that solely because they sound identical,
then sight, cite and site are versions of a word, for the same reason.
How would you say "there are three sights in the English language?"

Generally, a word is taken to mean a character string.
A given character string "bill" might have several meanings: something you pay, part of a cap, a law before it becomes a law ... etc.
But "bill" nevertheless is one word, and its sentence would be "There is one bill in the English language."

Does that help?
  • 0
The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell

#7 bonanova

bonanova

    bonanova

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 25 March 2008 - 04:08 AM

I said a word is defined as a character string.
I found some authorities that disagree with that.
If a character string "bark" for example has multiple meanings [dog, tree] you can say those are different words, called homographs.
Since they are pronounced the same, they are also homophones.
They could therefore be called homophonic homographs, but they're usually just called homonyms.

OK, so what are your words -- to, too, two?
Certainly they are homophones - they sound identical.
But since they are spelled differently - are different character strings - they are heterographs.
Homophonic heterographs, to be precise.
I'm not sure why they would not be called heterographic homophones, but then I'm also not sure who cares.

But wait, there's more.
What if they are spelled the same [homographs] but pronounced differently [heterophones]?
For example row [meaning an argument or fight] and row [as opposed to a column] -- what do we call them?
You might think they'd be called homographic heterophones. Or heterophonic homographs.
But no, thankfully.
They're called heteronyms.

The two persons with really strange interests who are still reading this post should now get on with your lives. :huh:
  • 0
The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
- Bertrand Russell




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users