Jump to content


Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum

Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum. Like most online communities you must register to post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process. To be a part of BrainDen Forums you may create a new account or sign in if you already have an account.
As a member you could start new topics, reply to others, subscribe to topics/forums to get automatic updates, get your own profile and make new friends.

Of course, you can also enjoy our collection of amazing optical illusions and cool math games.

If you like our site, you may support us by simply clicking Google "+1" or Facebook "Like" buttons at the top.
If you have a website, we would appreciate a little link to BrainDen.

Thanks and enjoy the Den :-)
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Murder in the Desert


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
168 replies to this topic

#101 defrostedice

defrostedice

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts

Posted 23 January 2008 - 07:59 AM

I would say A is the murderer seeing he is the one who put the poision in the water causing B to cut a slit in the sack...


I think otherwise

he died from thirst, not poisoning therefor the killer is B

SIMPLE LOGIC MAN! :lol:
  • 0

#102 legal geek

legal geek

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 04:41 PM

[quote name='rookie1ja' date='Mar 31 2007, 10:56 AM' post='120']
Murder in the Desert - Back to the River Crossing Puzzles
This is a story about three people (A, B a C) crossing a desert. A hated C and decided to kill him - he poisoned the water in his sack (only C had water). B also wanted to kill C (not knowing that the water of C had been already poisoned) and so B made a hole into the sack of C and the water spilt out. A few days later C died of thirst.
Who was the murderer - A or B?

A hates C
B hates C
C is the only one with water
Not A or B have water

But for A poisoning C's water sack, C would have had survived
But for B poking a hole in C's sack, C would have died from A's poisoned water rather than thirst
If A had not poisoned the water, B would have succeeded, and C would have died of thirst by B's voluntary act

B was not aware that A poisoned the water.

We know nothing about whether A or B have died of thirst and thus no inference can be made
Only that C died of thirst
The actual cause of C's death is thirst

So the question is who was the murderer A or B?
Both.

:o
  • 0

#103 legal geek

legal geek

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 04:46 PM

How could you charge "A" with murder if he didn't MURDER him? He TRIED to poison him by spiking the water. HE DID NOT DIE FROM BEING POISONED. He died of THIRST.. Attempted murder is when someone TRIES to kill someone, but is unsuccessful. That is what "A" did.. He TRIED to poison "C" but was unsuccessful. "B" had the intention of murdering him by ridding him of water. He had no idea that the water was already poisoned!!! His goal was simply to cut the bag, causing "C" to die from thirst. His attempt was SUCCESSFUL. "C" did in fact DIE from LACK OF WATER, NOT POISONING!!!

My conclusion stands...

A = Attempted Murder...
B = Murder

Are you really a Judge???



Hear hear! If I were a judge this ruling exactly. :lol:
  • 0

#104 legal geek

legal geek

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 04:54 PM

Well, my point is that intent doesn't matter. If I intend for someone to die of thirst in the desert, I am not responsible because my actions did not cause the death. Similarly, even if I started up my car and drove around looking for X to run over and someone else ran him over, I would not be a murderer (although, if caught I would be an attempted murderer).
I think in this analogue, C died as B wanted him to but as a consequence of A's actions. B just made sure it happened the way B wanted it to happen.

And hey, I just used word veracity since it is your screename... no doubting your truthfulness or the validity of your logic intended... (Just the validity of the conclusion <!-- s;) --><!-- s;) --> hehehe )... Sorry if that came across the wrong way... Or maybe we should argue the semantics of the word 'veracity' instead <!-- s:) --><!-- s:) -->)

Cheers!
--
Vig

P.S. I want you to have my kids!!


Intent matter is in the legal world.
It is the basis of the mens rae element, without intent you can't prosecute
Mens rea is the guilty mind (and A and B both had the guilty mind)
Actus reas and is the physical act (A and B both acted on their guilty mind)
Causation: in criminal law you need both the proximate cause and the actual cause
Need I explain?
harm -- death from thirst "a few days later"
a person can survive without water for about a week
Both are murders (tho in what degree is a different matter)
but the question asks who was the murderer?

both A and B were.

Edited by legal geek, 22 February 2008 - 05:02 PM.

  • 0

#105 Prince_Marth85

Prince_Marth85

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1405 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 06:51 PM

Ok... let me try and make this clearer to you...

The actions of A were intended to kill C by poisoning him
C died since A depleted C's supply of DRINKABLE WATER. Once A added the poison, C had no drinkable water. C died of thirst thereby making A's actions responsible for the murder.

It is irrelevant that C did not die the way A intended for him to.

The actions of B were intended to kill C
B's actions did not play a part in killing C since B just took away poisoned water from C which was irrelevant to C's death. B's actions in no way caused C's death.

It is irrelevant that C died the way B intended for him to.

I thereby question the veracity of your conclusion.


"B's actions in no way caused C's death." Are you MAD!?!? I'm not sure I get your logic there...How is it that B did not play a part in killing C!? B cut a slit in C's water supply, not knowing that A had already poisoned it, with the intent of killing C and he succeeded in that. A's attempt to kill C with poisoned water was unsuccessful since B took away C's water supply by draining it away. You stated that A is the killer since he depleted C's "drinkable water." Though this may make sense to a point...The water can more be considered tainted. The water was still "drinkable" if you will since he could have drank it...He just would have died from it. But in my eyes for the "tainted water", C did not DRINK the tainted water and B, unknowing that the water was poisoned, cut a slit in the water supply with full intent on killing C which is what happened. He died from dehydration, not from poisoning.

So I hearby stand by Veracity's conclusion.

A: Attempted murder by poisoning
B: Murder by slitting C's water supply causing dehydration
  • 0

#106 Beldurkin

Beldurkin

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 27 February 2008 - 07:23 PM

I don't know if anyone else sees it like this, but this sounds like a common senario: someone has the ability to prevent or report a crime but don't, making them accomplises after the fact. This may not make sense if you think of both attempt as seperate, but what if you think of them as a whole? Try this:

After B cuts C's water sack, A will know who cut it (assuming C is sane). Because he knew B cut the sack, the direct cause of death, but said nothing, he is an accomplise and thus just as guilty of B's sucessful attempt as his own unsucessful attempt. This only works one way, as A poision would never be discovered by B unless A confessed.

In conclusion:
B: Guilty of murder in the first degree
A: guilty of murder after the fact, guilty of attempted murder

How about that?
  • 0

#107 Freerefill

Freerefill

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 28 February 2008 - 03:53 PM

It's easy to say that, since C died of thirst and B deprived him of his liquid sustenance, B is the murderer. It seems logical. If you find a dead guy with a bullet in his head and a living guy with a gun in his hand, the bullets match, etc, then B is the murderer. But that's not necessarily so. It could be that C already had the bullet in his head, and B was simply found with the gun. Suppose B had no intent to kill, but C was found with a cut bag and B was found with a razor. Initially, you'd think that B was guilty, done and done, ship him off to jail and bring on the next riddle. If you analyze the soil where the water spilled out, however, you'd see that the water was poisoned before B got to him. So, B didn't do anything to kill C. C was already dead the moment A put poison in his water.

Ultimately though, there are multiple sides to this coin. I suppose, from the moral standpoint, intent to kill would be enough to convict A and B. From a legal standpoint, there are several occurrences:

Neither A nor B guilty: I would guess this would be the case. Find a guy dead from dehydration in the middle of the desert, who are you going to blame? The idiot for going into the desert in the first place. I think that alone is enough of an alibi to get A and B off scot-free. Maybe. They'd need a good lawyer. Also, because it's (obviously) not as clear cut as "A had a sword and C is cut cleanly in two", it might simply be impossible to determine.

A attempted murder, B innocent: A poisoned C's water, but C didn't die of poison. If you attack from that angle...

A murder, B innocent: A deprived C of drinkable water. From that point on, C was going to die of dehydration or poison. B could have added more poison or removed all the poisoned water and it wouldn't have mattered. The only thing B could have done was hastened C's death, but since C was already deprived of drinkable water and B cut the water sack AFTER A poisoned it, B did not hasten C's death.

A innocent, B attempted murder: I'm actually not sure if this situation would hold up. A could claim innocence if no trace of poison was found, and that's a big 'if'. However, if A was innocent, it falls on B to prove that he is not guilty of murder, yet retain the limits if this situation and still be guilty of attempted murder. It seems to me that if B was to be innocent of murder but guilty of the attempt, it would have to be shown that his attempt failed. The only way I could think that could occur would be if the water was poisoned (which forces A to be guilty of attempted murder) or if it could somehow be shown that the desert would have caused dehydration regardless of B depriving him of water. Kind of a weak angle.. but I suppose it's possible.

A innocent, B murder: If no poison was found and C was found with a cut water sack.. well, this angle has been repeated ad nauseum.

A and B attempted murder: Well, obviously. This would probably be another likely outcome in a court of law, but again, IANAL.

A and B murder: I think Legal Geek touched on this. Both had intent and acted on that intent. Legal Geek had a nifty Latin phrase for that. While it's kind of flimsy with C not being poisoned and not having any drinkable NOT because of B's actions.. I think it's still possible that they could both be tried and convicted of murder.

What really throws a wrench into all of this is who knows of what. B didn't know that the water was poisoned. If he did, it would completely change things. C didn't know that the water was poisoned either, and it could be that A and C never found out that B cut the bag.

In the end, no matter what happens to A and B, reading all of this and thinking about all of it has been enjoyable and a really great mental exercise.
  • 0

#108 RichKane

RichKane

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 04 March 2008 - 07:51 PM

im unsure as to if this point has been previously added because i dont fancy reading 11 pages at the moment :P. arguing semantics, C killed C by making A and B hating him. - one answer
and
some people are calling B the murder and arguing that even tho he lengthened C's life it is irrelivant, if we asume that the poison would have killed C in 1 day and the lack of water killed him after 3 days, does a doctor who kills someone after a year to prevent their imminent death murder him? a man living a week has an opperation where the doctor garentees his death after 2 weeks however allowing him life for a week. in no way can this be classed as murder and i put forward the most logical answer would like in A as the murderer B as the acomplace and C as the initator.
  • 0

#109 heatherlovesjade

heatherlovesjade

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 98 posts

Posted 04 March 2008 - 08:37 PM

he was going to die anyways....... t-e-a-m-w-o-r-k go teamwork... it was poisened just in case he took a sip and if he didnt the he had no water- but another thing if he was the only to have water- how did a and b live....... they killed thereselves
  • 0

#110 gwg

gwg

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 10 March 2008 - 10:12 PM

It's easy to say that, since C died of thirst and B deprived him of his liquid sustenance, B is the murderer. It seems logical. If you find a dead guy with a bullet in his head and a living guy with a gun in his hand, the bullets match, etc, then B is the murderer. But that's not necessarily so. It could be that C already had the bullet in his head, and B was simply found with the gun. Suppose B had no intent to kill, but C was found with a cut bag and B was found with a razor. Initially, you'd think that B was guilty, done and done, ship him off to jail and bring on the next riddle. If you analyze the soil where the water spilled out, however, you'd see that the water was poisoned before B got to him. So, B didn't do anything to kill C. C was already dead the moment A put poison in his water.


I respectfully disagree with a few of your points as well as your analogy. B was not "found with a razor" denying he had anything to do with it. They obviously did not analyze the sand where the water poured out ...etc, etc. this is all pure fabrication. The ONLY facts you have are stated in the puzzle.

Ok, so look at the facts, as stated in the riddle. A tried to kill C (intent and action). B tried to kill C (intent and action) unaware that A had already tried. These are the facts. At MINIMUM they are both attempted murderers. The puzzle is not asking who is an attempted murderer...so we must go on...

C was definitely NOT dead the moment A put poison in his water. YOU may believe him to be AS GOOD AS DEAD following some assumptions (again, not facts)...assuming that the poison a) would have killed him at all and b) the poison would have killed him BEFORE he was found ( a few days later apparently ). If he was ALREADY dead then someone else must have killed him. He was still alive (even if he may have already getting sick due to the poison...again an assumtion...for all we know the poison was completely ineffective) when B cut the bag...this can be deduced because if he were already dead there would be no reason to cut the bag....remember that B cut the bag with the intent of killing C.

This is an interesting puzzle...but I look to cause and effect...no water caused him to die of dehydration (fact). B caused the no water. B caused the death.

Had B not cut the bag, then the poison might have caused him to die of poisoning (we at least know he DID NOT die of poisoning). A administered the poison. A might have caused the death with no activity from B.

B caused his death...murderer.
A attempted to cause his death...attempted murderer.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users