Jump to content


Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum

Welcome to BrainDen.com - Brain Teasers Forum. Like most online communities you must register to post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process. To be a part of BrainDen Forums you may create a new account or sign in if you already have an account.
As a member you could start new topics, reply to others, subscribe to topics/forums to get automatic updates, get your own profile and make new friends.

Of course, you can also enjoy our collection of amazing optical illusions and cool math games.

If you like our site, you may support us by simply clicking Google "+1" or Facebook "Like" buttons at the top.
If you have a website, we would appreciate a little link to BrainDen.

Thanks and enjoy the Den :-)
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Children


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
62 replies to this topic

#41 link

link

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 31 December 2007 - 05:55 PM

... Ok, after reading the first two pages, I finally figured it out.. lol!

I'll try to explain what everyone's confused about...

Let's start with the beginning:
- Peter, how old are your children?
- Well Thomas, there are three of them and the product of their ages is 36.
- That is not enough ...

Let's find out the combinations (from youngest to oldest):
1 - 1 - 36 (sum is 38)
1 - 2 - 18 (sum is 21)
1 - 3 - 12 (sum is 15)
1 - 4 - 9 (sum is 14)
1 - 6 - 6 (sum is 13)
2 - 2 - 9 (sum is 13)
2 - 3 - 6 (sum is 11)
3 - 3 - 4 (sum is 10)

I think everyone is all right with this so far. Now the tricky part.
Here's the thing. The trick isn't so much math related. It's READING RELATED. Note the next two lines...

- The sum of their ages is exactly the number of beers we have drunk today.
- That is still not enough.

Most people are concentrating on the first line, but the SECOND LINE is EQUALLY important. Thomas knows how many beers they have drunk in that day. He sums up the number of beers and finds that the information Peter gives him is "still not enough". Therefore this indicates that the sum of their ages CANNOT BE UNIQUE and that as of right now, there must be two or more answers that sum up to the same number and their product is 36.

Therefore, the only two possible answers are:
1 - 6 - 6 (sum is 13)
2 - 2 - 9 (sum is 13)
(Note: This has nothing to do with Thomas suspecting twins of any sort)

Lastly:
- OK, the last thing is that my oldest child wears a red hat.

So this part gets controversial, but the main message is that there is only 1 oldest. If we're only comparing years (not minutes, or hours of difference), then there remains only one possible answer...

His children are 2, 2 and 9 years old.

I think this puzzle was pretty well written. Keep up the good work!
  • 0

#42 rookie1ja

rookie1ja

    Senior Member

  • Site Admin
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Slovakia

Posted 31 December 2007 - 06:41 PM

I'll try to explain what everyone's confused about...
I think this puzzle was pretty well written. Keep up the good work!


good job ... that was my line of thinking as well
  • 0

rookie1ja (site admin)
Optical Illusions
Support BrainDen

"To start: Press any key... Where's the 'any' key?" - Homer Simpson


#43 spiralangell

spiralangell

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 12 posts

Posted 11 January 2008 - 07:38 AM

So it's 9 2 2 ? Whoa I really needed alot of time on that, what a great puzzle, I worked out every possiable solution for forever. Wonderful. Honestly though the 6 6 1 and 9 2 2 was the hardest to decifer which was which. I look forward to more of your puzzles.
  • 0

#44 Standards

Standards

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 19 posts

Posted 07 February 2008 - 12:33 AM

I'm pretty sure having a 36 year old son and twin one year olds is biologically impossible. Saying Hypotheticly that the wifes menapause is about 50. Subtract 36 and you get 14. So, Having a son at the age of 14 is A.) In some cases impossible due to late growth hormones B.)Abortion anyone? or C.) Probably to avoid embarassment and future stress handed the baby off to foster/orphan care.
The world may never know.
  • 0

#45 amandadeemcminn

amandadeemcminn

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 09:56 PM

Wait...Peter is asking how old Thomas' children are but the teaser question asks how old Peter's children are. We do not know!



Actually, Thomas is asking how old Peter's children are.
  • 0

#46 lvrgrlvsherboy

lvrgrlvsherboy

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 23 February 2008 - 10:13 PM

Wait...Peter is asking how old Thomas' children are but the teaser question asks how old Peter's children are. We do not know!


no its not look


- Peter, how old are your children?
- Well Thomas, there are three of them and the product of their ages is 36.
- That is not enough ...
- The sum of their ages is exactly the number of beers we have drunk today.
- That is still not enough.
- OK, the last thing is that my oldest child wears a red hat.
How old were each of Peter's children?

Those are the actual sentences the friends told each other. so i doubt they are saying there own name before the start talking. so when the first sentence say Peter, how old are your children? it is just Thomas clarifying who he is talking to.
  • 0

#47 lvrgrlvsherboy

lvrgrlvsherboy

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 23 February 2008 - 10:16 PM

Let’s start with the known product – 36. Write on a sheet of paper the possible combinations giving the product of 36. Knowing that the sum is not enough to be sure, there are two possible combinations with the same sum (1-6-6 a 2-2-9). And as we learned further that the oldest son wears a hat, it is clear that the correct combination of ages is 2-2-9, where there is exactly one of them the oldest one.


Hey even though the two 6 yr olds are twins one is still older, so really either one is still an option
  • 0

#48 The Waco Kid

The Waco Kid

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 14 March 2008 - 07:58 PM

This was a very good one.
  • 0

#49 spamwolf

spamwolf

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 15 April 2008 - 10:15 PM

Why has no body noted that children can be born 9, 10 or 11 months apart and still be the same number of years old (since years is always rounded down)? Therefore the answer 1,6,6 does not require twins, and there would be a clear older brother.

An example just to be as clear as possible - one child just turned 6, the "oldest" child will be turning 7 next month but is still 6 now.
  • 0

#50 naihcollub

naihcollub

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 13 May 2008 - 04:45 AM

But the oldest wore a "red" hat, implying that, perhaps, he's a professional, like a fireman. Then the ages of the children would need to be 1-2-18, so that the oldest could be old enough to be a fireman. The number of beers they drank then would be 21, one drank ten and the other eleven. I imagine they're both drunk by now.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users